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Br41.M4U 

3 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



No. 74. 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

LICENSING BOARD FOR THE CITY 
or BOSTON. 



December, 1906. 




BOSTON: 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1907. 



plBlic document 



No. 74. 



AXXUAL REPORT 



^.LICEXSIXG BOAED FOR THE CITY 

OF BOSTOX. 



December, 1 9 G . 



BOSTOX : 

AVRIGHT ic POTTER PRIXTI>'Ct CO., STATE PRIXTERS, 
13 Post Office Square. 
1907. 



STATE UBRAPY OP MAMUSETTS, 

' J6 1912 " 

J5TAT£ HOUSE, BQSTOI^ 



Approyed by 
The State Board of Publication. 



33.6. ;i7M:- 

KEPOKT. 



Dec. 1, 1906. 

To His Excellency Curtis Guild, Jr., Governor. 

The LicensinjT Board for the City of Boston, in compliance 
with section 5, chapter 291 of the Acts of 19()(i, has the honor 
to submit the following report of the work of this dei)artment 
from June 1 to date, also a concise statement of the license 
situation as it was found on June 1. 

The department as at present organized is made up as fol- 
lows : Licensing Board, Ezra H. Baker, chairman, Fred A. 
Emerv and Samuel H. Hudson; secretary, Louis Epple. 

The Board has the use of the following rooms at 29 Pem- 
berton Square, set aside by the Police Commissioner : com- 
missioners' private office, second floor; general office, Room 
11; hearing room, Room 10; document room, Room 9. The 
rent has been apportioned by agreement with the Police 
Commissioner. 

The Board assumed on taking office that the license situation 
had been settled for this year hv its |)redecessors, and has 
acted upon that assumption. 

It is the intention of the Board in the future to give the 
citizens and tax payers of Boston first consideration in the 
gmnting of all privileges under its control. 

The Board has endeavored to prevent the introduction of 
l)olitics into the conduct of the liquor business, and to impress 
upon licensees that the intervention of friends is not welcomed 
or necessary, and has recommended that all applicants for any 
privilege should present their requests in person. 

The Board wishes as far as i)ossible to elevate the tone of 
the liquor business in Boston, and at the same time to avoid 
interference with the rights of all individuals. 



4 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



Licenses for the Sale of Intoxicating Lk^uor. 
The law licensing the sale of intoxicating liquor in this city 
provides that not more than 1 place shall be licensed for each 
500 of the population, as ascertained by the last national or 
State census, nor shall the number of places in any event 
exceed 1,000. 



Number of places licensed during the year, 978 

Number of licenses pending, 8 

Number of licenses surrendered for cancellation (37 of these were 

cancelled after June 1), 84 

Number of new licenses granted in their places, 84 

The following is a classified list of the licenses in force Nov. 
30, 190() : — 

First-class innholder, 71 

First-class victualler, 694 

Second-class victualler, 9 

Fourth-class distiller, ... 2 

Fourth-class wholesale dealer, " H,'' 99 

Fourth-class grocer, 74 

Fourth-class wholesale druggist, 6 

Fifth-class brewer, 21 

Total 976 

Sixth-class licenses, 225 

Seventh-class licenses, 20 

Club licenses, 52 

Total, 297 



Of the sixth-class licenses, 27 were cancelled. There will 
be noticed a ditforence between the places licensed during the 
year and the total of the classified list ; this difieience was 
caused by the fact that 1 license has been forfeited and 1 license 
has been granted but not paid for. 

During the month of January, 190(i, the licenses of 8 inn- 
holders were made void ; these were subsecjuently restored. 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 74. 



5 



Transfers. 

There were 5() licenses transferred between Dec. 1, 1905, 
and flune 1, 190(5 ; 3() of these were for alteration or extension 
of premises. 

There were 3G licenses transferred between »June 1, 190(3, 
and Nov. 30, 1906 ; 24 of these were for alteration or extension 
of premises. 

Rebates. 

There were 84 licenses surrendered for cancellation, and 
new licenses issued in their places. Where this was done, 
rebates to the amount of $49,801.35 have been grapted to the 
licensees surrendering. This leaves a net revenue of $1,430,- 
947.65 received for liquor licenses during the year. 

Complaints. 

Number of complaints for violations of conditions of liquor licenses 
made to the Board of Police from Dec. 1, 1905, to June 1, 1906, . 7 

Number of complaints for violation of conditions of liquor licenses 
made to the Licensing Board from June 1, 1906, to Nov. 30, 1906, . 4 

11 

Number of hearings given from Dec. 1, 1905, to June 1, 1906, . . 4 
Number of hearings given from June 1, 1906, to Nov. 30, 1906, . . 2 

6 

Forfeitures. 

Number of licenses forfeited from Dec. 1, 1905, to June 1, 1906, . . 3 
Number of licenses forfeited from June 1, 1906, to Nov. 30, 1906, . 1 

4 

The following shows the nature of the complaints upon 
which licenses were forfeited : — 

Selling intoxicating liquor in violation of license conditions, . . I 
Selling intoxicating liquor to an intoxicated person, . . . . 1 

Selling intoxicating liquor without a certificate, 1 

Selling intoxicating liquor to persons not members of the club, . . 1 



4 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



Table No. 1. — Liquor Licenses. 

Number of licenses issued and amount paid into the treasury 
from Dec. 1, 1905, to June 1, 1906, for the full year: — 



74 


innhf)lners, at f 2,UUU, .... 


# l4o,UUU 




670 


victuallers, at f 1,100, .... 


7eQ AAA 


AH 


9 


second-class victuallers, at f 500, 




uu 


DO/ 


wiioiesaie aeaiers, a, at ^owu. 


1Q7 100 


00 
yjyj 


10** 


wnoiesaie (leaiera, d, at . 


1 fid 000 


00 


78 


grocers, at f 800, 


62,400 


00 


2 


distillers, at $1,0( 0, .... 


2,000 


00 


6 


fourih-class wholesale druggists, at 








foOO 


3.000 


00 


76 


bottlers, at $500, 


38,000 


00 


21 


brewers, at $1,000, .... 


21,000 


00 


49 


clubs, at $300, 


14,700 


00 


214 


sixth-class druggists, at $1, 


214 


00 


19 


alcohol, at $1, 


19 


00 



11,413,933 GO 



Number of licenses issued and amount paid into the treasury 
from Dec. 1, 1905, to June 1, 1906, for part of year : — 



1 innholder, 

36 victuallers, . 

33 wholesale dealers, " A," 

4 wholesale dealers, " B," 

2 grocers, 
2 bottlers, 

1 second-class victualler. 



f 750 02 
13,692 46 
3,536 64 
733 18 
373 33 
204 04 
152 71 



Total, 



19,442 38 
f 1,433,375 38 



Number of licenses issued and amount paid into the treasury 
from June 1, 1906, to Nov. 30, 1906, for the full year: — 



8 victuallers, at $1,100, . 

6 wholesale dealers, " A," at $300, . 

2 wholesale dealers, " B," at f 1,000, 
1 bottler, at f .oOO, . 

3 clubs, at f 300, 
11 sixth-class druggists, at f 1, 

1 alcohol, at f I, 
Total. 



$8,800 00 
1,800 00 
2,000 00 
500 00 
900 00 
11 00 
1 00 



f 14,012 00 



Number of licenses issued and amount paid into the treasury 
from June 1, 1906, to Nov 30, 1906, for part of year : — 

4 innholders f4,733 07 

29 victuallers, 20,208 09 



Amounts carried forward, . . $24,941 16 $14,012 00 



190i>.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 



7 



Amounts brought forward. 



$24,941 16 $14,012 00 



31 wholesale dealers, " A,' 
1 wholesale dealer, " B," 
3 grocers, 
1 bottler, . 



5,842 93 
700 00 

1,484 53 
393 00 



Total, 



33,361 62 



$47,373 62 



Grand total, f 1,480,749 00 



Table No. 2. — Common Victuallers and Innholders. 
Common Victuallers. 
Dec. 1, 1905, to June 1, 1906 : — 



Applications granted. 
Places licensed 
Rejected, . 
Cancelled, 
Revoked, . 
Transferred, 

June 1, 1906, to Nov. 30, 1906 : — 
Applications granted 
Places licensed. 
Rejected, . 
Cancelled, 
Revoked, . 
Transferred, . 

Recapitulation, Dec. 1, 1905, to Nov. 30, 1906 : 
Applications granted. 
Places licensed, 
Rejected, . 
Cancelled, 
Revoked, . 
Transferred, . 



1,374 
1,233 
99 
138 
3 
31 

403 
256 

96 
144 
3 

21 

1,777 
1,489 
195 
282 
6 
52 



Of the common victualler's licenses granted, 25 were for lunch carts 



Innholders. 

Dec. 1, 1905, to June 1, 1906 : — 

Applications granted, .... 

Places licensed, 

Rejected, 

June 1, 1906, to Nov. 30, 1906 : — 

Applications granted, .... 
Places licensed, 

Recapitulation, Dec. 1, 1905, to Nov. 30, 1906 : — 

Applications granted, 

Places licensed, . . . . . 
Rejected, 



10 
10 
2 

1 
1 

11 
11 
2 



8 



LICENSING BOARD. 



Dec. 



Table No. 3. — Miscellaneous Licenses. 
Billiard, Pool, Sippio Tables and Bowling Alleys. 
Dec. 1, 1905, to June 1, 1906 : — 

Applications granted, 328 

Places licensed 229 

Rejected 25 

Transferred, 10 

Cancelled, 20 

Revoked, 5 

Fees collected ^2,872 

Jane 1, 1906, to Nov. 30, 1906 : — 

Applications granted, 90 

Places licensed . 85 

Rejected 23 

Transferred, 6 

Cancelled, .17 

Revoked 4 

Fees collected, ^576 

Recapitulation, Dec. 1, 1905, to Nov. 30, 1906 : — 

Applications granted, 418 

Places licensed, 314 

Rejected 48 

Transferred, 16 

Cancelled, 37 

Revoked 9 

Fees collected, $3,448 

Two complaints were heard and one application withdrawn. 

Intelligence Offices. 
Dec. 1, 1905, to June 1, 1906 : — 

Applications granted, 108 

Places licensed, .... ..... 91 

Rejected, 5 

Transferred, .......... 12 

Cancelled, 1 

Revoked, 1 

Fees collected, $3,575 

June 1, 1906, to Nov. 30, 1906 : — 

Applications granted, ........ 7 

Places licensed, 7 

Rejected, 2 

Transferred, .......... 8 

Cancelled, 6 

Fees collected, f 225 



i9or>.] 



PUBLIC DOCmiENT — No. 74. 



9 



Recapitulation, Dee. 1, 1905, to Nov. 30, 1906 : — 

Applications granted, 115 

Places licensed, 98 

Kejected, 7 

Transferred, 20 

Cancelled, 7 

Revoked, 1 

Fees collected, . . $3,800 

Of the applications granted : — 

39 were first-class, at $50, $1,950 

76 were second-class, at $25, 1,900 



^3,850 

1 first-class ($50) has not as yet been paid for, ... 50 



$3,800 

Skating Rinks. 
Dec. 1, 1905, to June 1, 1906 : — 

Applications granted, 3 

Places licensed, 3 

Rejected, 1 

Fees collected, $15 

No applications were granted or received from June 1, 1906, to Nov. 30, 
1906. 

Picnic Groves. 

The following picnic groves have been acted upon during the year : — 
Dec. 1, 19( 5, to June 1, 1906 : — 

Applications granted, 9 

Rejected, 9 

June 1, 1906, to Nov. 30, 1906 : — 

Applications granted, 2 

The total amount received and paid into the city treasury on 
account of miscellaneous licenses from Dec. 1, 1905, to Nov. 
30, 190li, was $7,263. 

Drivers' Permits. 
There have been acted upon from June 1, 190(), to Nov. 
30, 190(5, drivers' permits to deliver intoxicating liquors, as 
follows : — 



Granted 



Rejected, . 
Cancelled, 
Revoked, . 



Ill 



10 
14 
2 



10 



LICEXSIXG BOAKD. 



[Dec. 1906. 



Financial. 

On the Board's assuming oflSce, it was found to be necessary 
to apply to the city council for a requisition for money to 
carry on this oflBce for the balance of the year ; consecjuently, 
a draft was drawn on the city council for the sum of $23,400. 

There has been expended for regular running expenses of 
the department and for fitting up offices the sum of $15,074.18, 
leaving a Imlance of $s,325.82. 

The total expenditures of the department from June 1 to 
Dec. 1, 1906, were $19,679.20, the sum of $4,605.02 being 
paid out of the regular police appropriation. 

Recommendations. 

The Board respectfully recommends that provision be made 
by law for offices in some location other than that provided by 
the Police Commissioner in the present building, a^ it believes 
that the present quarters are not aderjuate for the projx^r 
transaction of its business. 

The Board respectfully recommends that it should be given 
the right by law to fix a minimum fee of at least $5 for every 
common victualler's license and of $25 for every innholder's 
license. As it is at the present time, the license, being issued 
without payment of fee, is regarded of little value, and too 
little responsibility is felt by the licensees for the proper con- 
duct of their business. 

During its term of office the Board has had frequent con- 
sultations with the Commissioner of Police, and wishes to 
express its heaity appreciation of his earnest co-operation and 
of the assistance of his subordinates. 

Respectfiilly submitted, 

EZRA H. BAKER, 
FRED A. EMERY, 
SAMUEL H. HUDSON, 

Licensing Board. 



9 



Public Document No. 74 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Licensing Board for the City 
OF Boston. 



December, 1907 




BOSTON: 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Squaee. 
1908. 



Public Document 



No. 74 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Licensing Board for the City 
OF Boston. 



Decembek, 1907. 




BOSTON: 

WRIGHT & potter PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1908. 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 



REPORT. 



To Ilis Excellency Curtis Guild, Jr , Oovernor. 

At the time of making its tirst report the Licensing Board 
believed that anything more than a formal statement of its 
work, with the usual tables, would be of little value, because 
of the short time during which it had held ofiice. In this 
second report, and in the future, it proposes to go more into 
details. 

In the granting of all licenses under its control the Board 
has required first that the api)licants shall be of good reputa- 
tion and competent to fulfil the obligations imposed by law. 
So far as possible, it has endeavored to restrict licenses to 
residents of the city of Boston, having due regard for nonresi- 
dents alreadj^ holding licenses. 

Liquor Licenses. 

While it has endeavored to interfere as little as possible 
with the actual details of the liquor business, it has made sev- 
eral requests and rulings for the guidance of those holding 
licjuor licenses, of which the following may be cited : — 

The nonexposure in licensed premises of political posters, 
etc. The elimination of political influence in the obtaining of 
licenses. 

The restriction of drinking by women to restaurants, with 
the hope of ultimately closing all barrooms to women. 

The nonuse of licensed premises for the paj nient of laborers. 

The abandonment of the custom bv licensees of ijivino: bottled 
liquors to customers during the holidays, thus following the 
precedent established by our predecessors. 



1 



LICENSING BOAKD. 



[Dec. 



In all such regulations the Board is glad to testify that it 
has received in the great majority of cases the ready acquies- 
cence and supj)()rt of licensees, especially of those who from 
long experience in the business know its dangers and Avelcome 
any opportunity to lessen them. In the future the Board in- 
tends to insist that improved cleanliness in many licensed 
premises shall be evident before the licenses are renewed, and 
that to no new applicant who cannot read or write the English 
laniruage shall a license of any kind be granted. 

In issuing liquor licenses the Board believes that it should 
consider not alone the desires of single precincts, wards or dis- 
tricts, but the welfare of the city as a whole. With this idea 
constantly before it, keeping in mind the existing conditions 
and the changes to be expected in every section of a large city, 
the Board has aimed to place such licenses in business rather 
than residential neighborhoods, and on main avenues in prefer- 
ence to side streets. 

It has decided that any increase in the number of saloon li- 
censes in close proximit}^ to the new subway entrances or exits 
will )wf l)e granted, although it has had numerous requests for 
such locations. 

The number of places where liquor can be sold has not been 
increased by this Board since it has taken office, and all li- 
censes have been granted by unanimous vote of the Board. No 
new location has been granted except after a personal inspec- 
tion of the premises b}^ every member of the Board. 

The Board has been urged to issue the total number of li- 
censes (1,000) authorized by the statute of 1899, because of 
the increased population of the city since that year. It has 
refused, and will refuse, at least for the coming year, to issue 
any of the fourteen licenses found to be unissued at the time 
it took office, as well as one other license which it has retired. 

The unequal distribution of licenses in the different sections 
of the city has received constant consideration and discussion 
from the Board. AVhile it does not believe that an equal per 
capita distribution would be advisable, even if possible, it does 
believe that some sections of the city have, as, the follow- 
ing tables show, an undue proportion of licenses, with the 
result that in certain sections a few licenses have a complete 
monopoly. 



11)07.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 74. 



5 



Distribution of Licenses. 

[Population (Decennial Census of 1905), 595,380.] 



District. 


Population. 


Licensed Places. 


Boston proper, .... 

Roxburj,- 

South Boston, .... 

Charlestovvn 

East Boston, .... 
West Roxburj, .... 
Brighton, ..... 
Dorchester, 


166,428 
102,180 
64,091 
39,983 
51,334 
64.179 
21,806 
95,379 


686 including 400 saloons. 
142 " 99 

80 " 68 

74 " 59 

42 " 34 

26 " 15 

11 " 9 

12 " 6 






973 


690 



Boston proper has 1 license to ever}^ 284 inhabitants, and 1 
saloon to every 41 G. 

Roxburyhas 1 license to every 719 inhabitants, and 1 saloon 
to every 1 ,032 — . 

South Boston has 1 license to every 801 inhabitants, and 1 
saloon to every 942 -|-. 

Charlestown has 1 license to every 540 inhabitants, and 1 
saloon to every 677+. 

East Boston has 1 license to every 1,222 inhabitants, and 1 
saloon to every 1,509+. 

West Roxbury has 1 license to every 2,083 inhabitants, and 
1 saloon to ever}^ 3,611+. 

Brighton has 1 license to every 1,982 inhabitants, and 1 
saloon to every 2,422+. 

Dorchester has 1 license to every 7,948 inhabitants, and 1 
saloon to every 15,896+. 

Licensed Places. 





Innholders. 


Saloons. 


Grocers. 


Other Classes. 


Total. 


Boston proper. 


69 


400 


33 


84 


686 


Roxbury, 


2 


99 


20 


21 


142 


South Boston, 


1 


68 


1 


10 


80 


Charlestown, 


2 


69 


7 


6 


74 


East Boston, 
West Roxbury, . 


2 


34 


4 


2 


42 


1 


16 


4 


6 


26 


Brighton, 
Dorchester, . 


1 


9 




1 


11 




6 


5 


1 


12 


Total, . 


78 


690 


74 


131 


973 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



The following are the only changes in the number of licensed 
places made in suburban districts since the Board assumed 
office : — 

In the year ending Nov. 30, 190G, one hotel license, origi- 
ntiUv existing as a saloon license in the city proper, was granted 
at Forest Hills. 

In the year ending Nov. 30, 1907, three grocers' licenses 
were granted in Dorchester. Of these, two originally existed 
as saloon licenses and one as a grocers license in the city proper. 

One grocer's license, originally existing as a saloon license 
in the city proper, was granted in Jamaica Plain, and took the 
place of a grocer's license removed to the city proper from 
Jamaica Plain the previous year. 

After a careful study of the dilferent sections of the city, the 
Board believes that under present conditions the number of 
licensed ])lacos in the neighborhood of the North Station and 
the already overcrowded residential districts of Koxburj^ 
Charlestown, East Boston and South Boston (in none of which 
sections has this Board placed additional licenses), should not 
be increased, but should be gradually decreased. 

Not one additional first and fourth class license, commonly 
known as a saloon license, has been placed in any suburban 
district, such as Brighton, Dorchester, West Roxburv or 
Orient Heights, by this Board. 

The Board regrets that in too many cases those who are 
opposed to the granting of liquor licenses have seen tit to 
employ methods which they would be the first to condemn in 
any one seeking a license, and it has refrained from making 
any public corrections of misrepresentations of its actions 
(although invited so to do), because it did not wish even to 
appear desirous of influencing the vote on license. 

Every member of the Board has been annoyed by repeated 
solicitations and requests outside of our public office from those 
who were supposed, from their personal relations, to have some 
secret influenee with us. Such solicitations and requests have 
been as oflfensive to us as the interference of those who, from 
their })ul)lic positions, without sharing our responsibilities, 
were sujiposed to be able to control our actions or to reverse 
our decisions. 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 



7 



12 O'CLOCK Privileges. 

The so-called " 12 o'clock" privilege is held at present by 
25 hotels. In choosing the hotels to which this privilege was 
granted, the Board was governed Hrst by the good reputation 
of the ai)pli('ant, and secondly by the location of the hotel ; 
2G were originally issued, afterward increased to 28. 

The Board believes that the intent of the act was to aid the 
commercial interests of Boston, and therefore has i)laced none 
of these 12 o'clock " privileges in hotels in the suburban or 
outlying districts. 

It has also considered that these privileges should be depend- 
ent upon the management of the hotel in question, and should 
be withdrawn at any time when conditions demanded. For 
this reason 8 privileges have been withdrawn, so that there are 
now only 25 in operation. 

Increase of Fees. 

For the year beginning May 1, 1908, the Board proposes to 
increase the fee for a grocer's license from $800 to $1,000, and 
the club license from $300 to $500. 

There has been no change in the staff of the permanent em- 
ployees of the Board, who have been well organized by our 
direction and under the supervision of our efficient secretary. 

Recommendations . 
In its first report the Board, because of its short term of 
office, contented itself with making two recommendations, as 
follows : — 

The Board respectfully recommends that provisions be made by law for 
offices in some location other than that provided by the Police Commis- 
sioner in the present building, as it believes that the present quarters are 
not adequate for the proper transaction of its business. 

The Board respectfully recommends that it should be given the right by 
law to fix a minimum fee of at least $5 for every common victualler's li- 
cense and of $25 for every innholder's license. As it is at the present time, 
the license, being issued without payment of fee, is regarded of little value, 
and too little responsibility is felt by the Hcensees for the proper conduct 
of their business. 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



Both of these recommendations it renews. 

The work of the past year has convinced the Board that its 
present quarters are inadequate. Its hearing room is small and 
poorly ventilated, and the clerks' and document rooms are 
crowded. 

The expense entailed on the city from investigating and in- 
specting the premises of common victuallers, the carelessness 
of many of the holders of common victualler's licenses, and the 
little value in many instances })laced on the licenses, are some 
of the reasons believed by the Board as sufficient for the passage 
of an act authorizing the charging of a fee of not less than $2 
in each case. 

The Board recommends also that an act be passed authoriz- 
ing the gi-anting of licenses to persons to keep their stores 
open on the Lord's Day for the sale of fruit, ice cream, soda 
and newspapers, and to charge a fee of not less than $2 for such 
licenses. The Board believes that such an act would improve 
the standing of the common victuallers throughout the city, 
and would abolish the subterfuges sometimes practised by 
them. 

Another recommendation of the Board is that it may have 
the right to suspend a liquor license for such a period of time 
as it may deem proper, upon satisfactory proof that the condi- 
tions of the license have been broken. The Board believes 
that the passage of such an act would enable it to inflict more 
equitable punishment than it can now do under the law. Many 
cases have been reported to the Board where a condition of a 
license has been broken, sometimes unwittingly, sometimes 
through carelessness, and often by the error of an employee 
against the express commands of his employer. It is to im- 
prove the conditions in licensed places, and at the same time to 
prevent injustice to the licensee, that the Board asks for this 
legislation. 

The Board would also recommend the })assage of iin act giv- 
ing it authority to pay its secretary an annual salary not exceed- 
ing $3,500, as it has interpreted the law to mean that all fees, 
previously retained by the secretary, should be paid to the 
city. 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMEXT — No. 74. 



9 



Licenses for the Sale of Intoxicating Liquor. 
The law licensing the sale of intoxicating liquor in this city 
provides that not more than 1 place shall be licensed for each 
500 of the population, as ascertained by the last national or 
State census, nor shall the number of places in any event ex- 
ceed 1,000. 



Number of places licensed during the year, 
Number of licenses pending, . . . . 
Number of licenses surrendered for cancellation, 
Number of new licenses granted in their places. 



974 
10 
87 
87 



The following is a classified list of the licenses in force Nov. 
30, 1907 : — 



First-class innholder, 
First-class victualler, 
Second-class victualler, 
Fourth-class distiller, . 
Fourth-class wholesale dealer '* B 
Fourth-class grocer. 
Fourth-class wholesale druggist. 
Fifth-class brewer, 

Total, .... 

Sixth-class licenses. 
Seventh-class licenses, . 
Club licenses. 

Total 



78 
690 
7 
2 

95 

74 
6 

21 

973 

224 
14 

60 

288 



Of the sixth-class licenses, 12 were cancelled, 5 transferred 
and 2 forfeited. 

There will be noticed a difference between the places licensed 
during the year and the total of the classified list ; this differ- 
ence is caused by the fact that 1 license has been granted but 
not paid for. 

During the year there were 47 applications rejected and 27 
applications withdrawn . 

Transfers. 

There were 80 licenses transferred during the year 5 61 of 
these were for alteration or extension of premises. 



10 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



Rebates. 

Eighty-seven licenses have been surrendered for cancella- 
tion, and new licenses issued in their place. AVhere this was 
done, rebates to the amount of $5(),441.71 have l)een granted 
to the licensees surrendering, leaving a net revenue of $1,453, 
452.99 received for liquor licenses during the year. 

COMPLAIXTS. 

Eight complaints have been received for violation of condi- 
tions of their licenses, as follows : G from the Police Commis- 
sioner and 2 from outside parties. 

Forfeitures. 

Two drug licenses were forfeited, on complaint from the 
Police Commissioner. One 12 o'clock privilege was forfeited, 
on complaint of the Police Commissioner (specific charge, 
gambling) . 

Table No. 1. — Liquor Licenses. 
Number of licenses issued and amount paid into the treasury 
from Dec. 1, 1906, to Dec. 1, 1907, for full year: — 



78 innholders, at f 2,000, .... 


$156,000 00 


690 victuallers, at $1,100, . . . . 


759,000 00 


8 second-class victuallers, at f 500, . 


4,000 00 


671 wholesale dealers " A," at $300, . 


201,300 00 


158 wholesale dealers " B," at $1,000, 


158,000 00 


78 grocers, at f 800, 


62,400 00 


2 distillers, at $1,000 


2,000 00 


6 fourth-class wholesale druggists, at 




^^500, 


3,000 00 


21 brewers, at $1,000 


21,000 00 


70 bottlers, at $500, 


35,000 00 


51 clubs, at $300, 


15,300 00 


247 sixth-class druggists, at $1, . 


247 00 




14 00 



11,417,261 00 



Number of licenses issued and amount paid into the treasury 
from Dec. 1, 1906, to Dec. 1, 1907, for part of year : — 

16 innholders $16,632 74 

60 victuallers, 30,918 88 



Amou7its carried forward, .... $47,551 62 $1,417,261 00 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 



11 



Amounts brought forward, . 

63 wholesale dealers " A," 
10 wholesale dealers " B," 

1 grocer, .... 

1 wholesale druggist, 

1 distiller, 

1 brewer, 

3 bottlers, 



$47,551 62 $1,417,261 00 

9,538 07 
6,765 38 

166 67 

191 52 

263 87 

833 40 

823 17 
66,133 70 



25 special 12 o'clock liquor privileges, at 
f500, from Dec. 1, 19C6, to May 1, 
1907 12,.500 00 

28 special 12 o'clock liquor privileges, for 

the full year, 14,000 00 

26,500 00 



Total, $1,509,894 70 



Becapilulaiion. 



94 innholders, . $172,632 74 

750 victuallers, 789,918 88 

8 second-class victuallers, 4,000 00 

734 wholesale dealers " A,'' 210,838 07 

168 wholesale dealers " B," 164,765 38 

79 grocers, 62,566 67 

3 distillers, 2,263 87 

7 fourth-class wholesale druggists, 3,191 52 

22 brewers, 21,833 40 

73 bottlers, 35,823 17 

51 clubs, 15,300 00 

247 sixth-class druggists, 247 00 

14 alcohol, 14 00 

53 12 o'clock privilege licenses, 26,500 00 



Total $1,509,894 70 



Table No. 2. — Common Victuallers and Innholders. 
Common Victuallers. 



Applications gran 
Places licensed, 
Rejected, 
Transferred, . 
Cancelled, 
Revoked, 



ed. 



1,585 
1,426 
125 
22 
153 
6 



Of the common victuallers' licenses granted, 25 were for lunch carts. 



12 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



Innholders. 

Applications granted, 14 

Places licensed, 13 

Rejected, 5 

Cancelled, 1 



Pool Rooms. 

The Board has noticed a tendency on the part of sonae li- 
censees to be careless in the observance of some of the con- 
ditions of their licenses, notably those forbidding irambling 
and the presence of minors. The Board has insisted and will 
insist on the strictest observance of these conditions. It in- 
tends also that there shall be a marked improvement in the 
conditions now obtaining in certain pool rooms. 

Intelligence Offices. 
The Board believes that a great improvement in the con- 
ditions now obtaining in many intelligence offices is both pos- 
sible and desirable for the benefit of employers and those 
seeking employment. Sanitary conditions in many places 
must be improved, and a more correct record kept of fees paid 
and of the former employment and character of all applicants 
for employment. 



Table No. 3. — Miscellaneous Licenses. 
Billiard, Pool and Sippio Tables, and Bowling Alleys. 



Applications granted 
Places licensed, . 
Rejected, . 
Transferred, 
Cancelled, . 
Revoked, . 
Fees collected, . 



Number of Tables and Alleys. 

Billiard 272 

Pool 1,187 

Sippio, 3 

Bowling alleys, •. 407 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 



18 



Intelligence Offices. 

Applications granted 107 

Places licensed, 89 

Rejected, 5 

Transferred, o 

Cancelled, 4 

Fees collected $3,350 

Of the applications granted : — 

34 were first class, at f50, ? 1,700 

73 were second class, at $25, . . . . 1,825 

?3,525 

3 first class (§50) have not as yet been paid for, . $150 
1 second class (f 25) has not as yet been paid for, . 25 



175 
$3,350 

Skating Rinks. 

Applications granted, 1 

Rejected, ............ 

Fees collected, §5 

Total amount received and paid into the city treasury on account of 
miscellaneous licenses, $7,093 

Picnic Groves. 

Applications granted, 3 

Places licensed, 2 

Revoked, 1 

Drivers^ Permits. 

Granted, 200 

Rejected, 13 

Cancelled, 46 

Revoked, 1 

Table No. 4. — ComparisOxVS 

1906-07. 1907-08. 

First-class innholder 71 78 

First-class victualler, 694 690 

Second-class victualler, 9 7 

Fourth-class distiller, , 2 2 

Fourth-class wholesale dealer " B," .... 99 95 

Fourth-class grocer, 74 74 

Fourth-class wholesale druggist, 6 6 

Fifth-class brewer, 2121 

976 973 



14 LICENSING BOARD. [Dec. 

Sixth-class druggist 225 224 

Seventh-class alcohol, 20 14 

Clubs 62 50 

297 288 

Common Victuallers. 

Applications granted, 1,777 1,585 

Places licensed 1,489 1,426 

Rejected, 195 125 

Cancelled 282 153 

Revoked, 6 6 

Transferred 52 22 

Innholders. 

Applications granted, 11 14 

Places licensed 11 13 

Rejected, 2 5 

Cancelled, - 1 

Billiard, Pool and Sippio Tables^ and Bowli)ig Alleys. 

Applications granted, 418 406 

Places licensed, 314 324 

Rejected, 48 54 

Transferred, 16 16 

Cancelled, 37 34 

Revoked 9 10 

Intelligence Offices. 

Applications granted, 115 107 

Places licensed, 98 89 

Rejected, , 7 5 

Transferred 20 6 

Cancelled, 7 4 

Revoked, 1 

Skating Rinks. 

Applications granted, 3 1 

Places licensed, 3 1 

Rejected, 1 

Pic7iic Groves. 

Applications granted, 11 3 

l*laces licensed, 9 2 

Rejected 2 1 

Drivers' Permits. 

Granted Ill 200 

Rejected 10 13 

Cancelled, 14 46 

Revoked, 2 1 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCLMKNT— No. 74. 



15 



Table No. 6. — Keceipts ani> Expenditukks, Account of Licenses. 

1906-07. 1907-08. 

Liquor licenses, 11,480,749 OU $1,509,894 7U 

Rebates, 49,801 35 56,441 71 



$1,430,947 65 $1,453,452 99 
Miscellaneous licenses, .... 7,263 00 7,093 00 



Total, $1,438,210 65 $1,460,545 99 



Anticipating special expenses for increased quarters, for in- 
vestigations and possible employment of counsel, the Board re- 
quested from the city government an appropriation of $00,000 
for the present fiscal year, and Avas granted $')0,000. As it 
has not been obliged to incur the above expenses this year, it 
will have at the end of the fiscal year an unexpended balance 
of approximately $12,000. 



License Fees as fixed by the Board for the Year 

1907-08. 

The fees for licenses have been fixed at the following rates 
for the year commencing May 1, 1907, and ending April 30, 
1908, viz. : — 

For licenses of the first class, to sell all kinds of liquor, to 
be drunk on the premises : — 

Innholders $2,000 00 

Privilege to serve liquors to midnight (innholders), , 500 00 
Common victuallers, 1,100 00 

For licenses of the second class to sell malt liquors, cider 
and light wines, containing not more than fifteen per 
centum of alcohol, to be drunk on the premises : — 

Common victuallers, 500 00 

For licenses of the fourth class, to sell all kinds of liquor 
and to bottle distilled liquors, not to be drunk on the 
premises : — 

Wholesale druggists, 500 00 

Grocers, 800 00 

Wholesale dealers " A," issued only in conjunction with 

a first-class license, 300 00 

Wholesale dealers " B," 1,000 00 

Distillers, 1,000 00 



10 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 1907. 



For licenses of the fifth class, to sell raalt liquors, cider 
and light wines, containing not more than fifteen per 
centum of alcohol, not to be drunk on the premises : — 

Bottlers, issued only in conjunction with another license, f 500 00 

Brewers, 1,000 00 

For a license of the sixth class, to druggists, ... 1 00 

For a license of the seventh class, to sell pure alcohol, 1 00 

For a club license, 300 00 



The Board is glad to express its appreciation of the cordial 
support and hearty co-opemtion in all its plans and wishes 
shown by the Commissioner of Police, and by the oflScers and 
men of his department. 

Respectful ly submitted, 

EZRA H. BAKER, 
FRED A. EMERY, 
SAM'L H. HUDSON, 

Licensing Board. 



Public Document No. 74 



ANNUAL REPORT 



LICENSING BOARD FOR THE CITY 
OF BOSTON. 



December, 1908. 




BOSTON: 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1909. 



Public Document 



No. 74 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

LICENSING BOARD FOR THE CITY 
OP BOSTON. 



December, 1908. 




BOSTON: 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1909. 

^ 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 



^l)t ^cmmonujcaltl) of ilIa06acl)U0ett6. 



REPORT. 



Dec. 1, 1908. 

To His Excellency Curtis Guild, Jr., Governor. 

In preseiiting this, its third annual report, the Licensing 
Board takes the opportunity of restating the leading policies it 
has adopted in the granting of liquor licenses, — policies which 
it intends to follow in the future. It realizes that existing con- 
ditions prevent the immediate fulfillment of its plans, but hopes 
each year will show steady progress. The most important of 
these policies are : — 

*The restriction of liquor licenses, especially saloons, to busi- 
ness neighborhoods and main thoroughfares. 

The restriction of drinking by women to hotels and res- 
taurants. 

The non-increase, under present conditions, of the number 
of licensed places in South Boston, Charlestown, East Boston, 
in the vicinity of the i^orth Station and in certain parts of 
Eoxbury, and the non-increase of saloon licenses in close prox- 
imity to subway entrances and exits and transfer stations. 

The granting of all new licenses controlled by this Board 
only to ho?ia fide citizens of Boston. 

The Board intends also to insist that every transfer of liquor 
licenses, either to new locations or to new owners, shall be 
marked by a decided improvement in the licensed premises, 
either in the manner in which the business is conducted, or in 
improvement to the real estate, or both. In pursuance of this 
policy, out of 17 transfers granted the past year 4 were from 
residential to business sections, 1 from a side street to a main 
thoroughfare, and the others (transfers practically within the 
same districts) to better appointed places. 



4 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



The great majority of transfers were marked by distinct im- 
provements to the real estate as well as by an improvement in 
the conditions within the premises. In addition, 54 alterations 
in premises (technically transfers of locations) were granted, in 
each case marked by an improvement in the premises. 

Rebates. 

Under the authority given in section 20, chapter 100, Revised 
Laws, for several years rebates have been granted when a license 
has been surrendered and cancelled and a new one issued in place 
thereof. The giving of these rebates has, the Board believes, 
unduly stimulated the traffic in licenses, and has had a tendency 
to lessen the feeling of personal responsibility that every licensee 
should have. To such an extent has the rebate system grown 
that the Board will refuse in the future all rebates except in 
case of death or some similar imperative cause, and will notify 
the licensees to that effect. 

N'OTIFICATIOXS OF CONVICTIONS. 

Since the Board took office, in June, 1906, it has not received 
a notification from any court of this city of any conviction of 
any licensee for any violation of any law relative to the busi- 
ness he is licensed to pursue, although under section 56, chapter 
100, Revised Laws, such notification should be made. 

Section 56. Upon the conviction of a holder of a hcense for the sale of 
intoxicating hquors of the Aiolation of any law relative to the business he 
is licensed to pursue, the court in which or the magistrate before whom 
he has been convicted shall send to the board which issued the license a 
certificate under seal, showing the time and place of such conviction. 

The Board in April last, after communicating with the chief 
justices of the superior and municipal courts and the presid- 
ing justices of the district courts, was promptly assured by the 
chief justices of the superior and municipal courts that the 
clerks of the courts would be notified to send the Board such cer- 
tificates. The Board realizes that in many cases, especially in 
those in which a plea of guilty is entered, the fact that the 
accused is a licensee may not be disclosed, but it has yet to 
receive its first report from the clerk of any court. Its infor- 
mation on such matters comes almost entirely from the police. 



1908.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 



5 



The Board would recommend that the statute should be made 
more explicit, so as to cover the conviction of every employee 
of a licensee, and that the complaint should describe the accused 
as a licensee or as employed by a licensee. 

Complaints. 

Frequently at hearings on protests against the granting of 
licenses, the remonstrants have made general charges that condi- 
tions prejudicial to good order existed in places already licensed 
near the desired location. Although the Board has in every 
such case invited the remonstrants to prefer formal complaints, 
either at that time or at a later date, when applications for 
renewal of licenses were to be acted upon, it has in no case re- 
ceived a complaint from citizens. Under the authority given 
by act of the Legislature in 1908, the Board is prepared to give 
hearings on complaints brought either by the police department 
or by private parties, and to suspend licenses in cases where the 
charges are proved. 

Druggists' Licenses. 
Ill March last the Board obtained from the police a report 
of the sales of liquor in the licensed drug stores in Brighton, 
Dorchester, South Boston and West Roxbury, with the result 
that action on the applications of 15 of the druggists for a re- 
newal of their licenses was postponed for some three weeks, 
until the Board itself, acting under the authority given by sec- 
tion 27, chapter 100, Revised Laws, had had an opportunity 
to examine the liquor books and to interview the proprietors of 
the drug stores. There was no charge against these druggists of 
selling illegally, but there was a belief that the business ap- 
proached too closely to that of retail liquor stores. This belief 
was confirmed by an examination of the books and by the testi- 
mony of the druggists themselves. The books showed, and the 
druggists admitted, that sales were made to regular customers, 
strangers being often refused. One druggist testified that he 
had not applied for a drug license because the granting of a 
grocer's license in the neighborhood had made it not worth 
his while to sell liquor." 



6 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



The books showed, for instance, one customer who purchased 
whiskey in half pints regularly twice a week. 

Another, whose taste for whiskey was modified by a liking 
for gin, bought both of these articles in varying quantities about 
three times a week. 

Another, whose purchases were equally divided between rum 
and whiskey, purchased these at intervals of two days. 

The purchase at a drug store not far from the Brookline line 
of a bottle of Martini cocktails, and the purchases in other 
suburban stores of bottles of ale, stout and beer, suggest to the 
Board that the purchases would have been more properly de- 
scribed as intended for convivial instead of medicinal ])ur- 
poses." 

At the time the Board w^as considering these 15 licenses it was 
solicited by many reputable citizens to reissue these licenses at 
once. Such solicitations, in behalf of not only druggists but of 
licensees of all kinds, have follow^ed the members of the Board 
to their homes and private offices, as well as to the offices of the 
Board. Apparently some persons do not take seriously the 
statement of the Board, in its last report, that Such solici- 
tations and requests have been as offensive to us as the inter- 
ference of those who, from their public positions, -without shar- 
ing our responsibilities, were supposed to be able to control 
our actions or to reverse our decisions." These solicitations 
have no effect favorable to the applicant upon the action of 
the Board. 

So impressed was the Board by the result of its preliminary 
investigation that in November it obtained from the police a 
report of the sales of liquor in every licensed drug store in the 
city during the months of May, June, July, August and Sep- 
tember of this year. An exhaustive examination of these re- 
ports has given much interesting information. 

Although the Board believes, from its examination of these 
books and rc])orts, as well as from the repeated testimony of 
many of the licensees, that the liquor traffic is not desired by 
many of the druggists, and is followed by them only through 
fear of losing their legitimate trade, it does believe that in 
many cases the principal business of a drug store is really a 
retail liquor business, carried on under a license costing only 
$1 in competition with a grocer's license costing $1,000. 



1908.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 



7 



During these five months, in which the liquor traffic is light- 
est, there were sold in Boston — a license city — over 1,500 
gallons of liquor of all kinds, of which the larger part, about 
980 gallons, was whiskey, sold apparently in fixed quantities of 
liquid measure, generally by the half pint. About 40 per cent, 
of the sales were reported as being made on Saturdays and 
Mondays. So many sales on these days (coupled with the fact 
that very few sales were reported as made on Sundays, and 
with the additional fact that licenses have been revoked for 
illegal selling on Sunday) lead the Board to believe that more 
liquor is sold on Sundays than is actually recorded on the 
druggists' books. 

In these later reports, as in the former, the regular customer 
appears very frequently with his almost daily half pint of 
whiskey or quart of ale, while the resident of an adjoining 
no-license town anticipates a holiday with two quarts of whis- 
key, one quart of rum and two quarts of brandy. 

Of the 13 druggists under station 16, 1 (located near the 
Brookline line) recorded sales of 50 gallons of whiskey and 34 
gallons of malt liquors out of total sales in that division of 91 
gallons of whiskey and 36 gallons of malt liquors. 

The greatest proportion of sales, both in number of pur- 
chasers and in total quantities sold, especially of whiskey, was 
in Dorchester, where 38 druggists sold 326 gallons, while 
during the same period the remaining 172 druggists in all the 
other parts of the city sold only 654 gallons, thus making the 
amount sold in Dorchester almost exactly one-third of the total 
sales in the entire city. In the two suburban districts of West 
Roxbury and Brighton there were sold 51 gallons and 60 gal- 
lons, respectively ; in South Boston, 40 gallons ; in Roxbury 
and a part of the South End, 125 gallons; in the four districts 
under police stations 1, 2, 3 and 4 (including the ^v'orth End, 
West End, the business and shopping districts and approaches 
to the N'orth and South stations), a total of less than 280 gal- 
lons, all of whiskey, were sold. 

As is well known, the development of the chemistry of medi- 
cine makes the use of alcoholic liquors in compounding pre- 
scriptions very much less than formerly, and the tendency of 
all physicians is not to prescribe for immediate use alcoholic 
preparations, especially malt liquors. 



8 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



In a city like Boston, with its large number of licensed liquor 
places, the fee of $1 for druggists is an absurdity, and the 
ease with which liquors may be obtained at many drug stores, 
especially in the suburban sections, is an encouragement of 
hypocrisy and law breaking. 

The Board therefore recommends that the license fee for 
druggists in Boston should be fixed at not less than $100, and 
that sales should be restricted to small quantities, furnished 
only on a physician's prescription, which should be cancelled 
and kept as a record by the druggists, and that no ale, beer, 
stout, etc., should be sold by any druggist. It further recom- 
mends that every bottle be labelled plainly with the druggist's 
name and location, and that sales of liquor in original packages 
should be forbidden. 

As the use of alcohol in sickness, for bathing and other pur- 
poses, has greatly increased, the Board recommends that there 
should be granted to druggists a special license for the sale of 
alcohol only, the fee to be not less than $10, and that the fee 
of the seventh-class license to dealers in paints or in chemicals 
to sell alcohol for mechanical, manufacturing or chemical pur- 
poses only should be increased from $1 to $10. 

The occasional purchase of half a pint of whiskey or a bottle 
of beer at a drug store seems at first glance to be a matter of 
little consequence, but when the custom of regular and repeated 
purchases, especially before holidays and Sundays, as shown by 
the druggists' books, of whiskey, beer and ale becomes wide- 
spread, the intent of the law is either misunderstood or deliber- 
ately disregarded. 

The Board refused to reissue 11 druggists' licenses because 
of convictions for sales of cocaine. 

As compared with the methods of many druggists the con- 
duct of the majority of the so-called saloon keepers is highly 
commendable. 

Club Licenses. 
The club license seemed to the Board to be so valuable a priv- 
ilege that the fee was advanced from $300 to $500, although 
the Board realized that the increase might work hardship to 
a few small clubs. The policy of the Board has been to grant 



1908.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 



9 



such licenses only to established clubs in good standing, and 
not to grant the license in such a way that it should be used 
as a nucleus around which a club might be built. This policy 
it will continue to pursue. 

Common Victualer Licenses. 
In its report for 1907 the Board made the following recom- 
mendation : — 

The expense entailed on the city from investigating and insjjecting the 
premises of common victualers, the carelessness of many of the holders 
of common victualers' licenses, and the little value in many instances 
placed on the licenses, are some of the reasons beheved by the Board as 
sufficient for the passage of an act authorizing the charging of a fee of not 
less than $2 in each case. 

The experience of the past year confirms the Board in its 
belief that a fee should be charged. Not only must every ap- 
plication be investigated by the police and reported upon to the 
Board, but the licensed places must be frequently inspected. 
Every licensee must be furnished with a pamphlet giving the 
laws covering the common victualer licenses. Licenses must 
be prepared, taking the time of clerks and necessitating, the 
Board fears, additional clerical help, and much time of the 
Board itself is taken in interviewing the applicants, hearing 
complaints and passing on frequent transfers. 

During the past year 2,107 applications were granted, as 
against 1,585 the previous year, and on Nov. 30, 1908, there 
were 1,704 licenses in force, as against 1,426 on the same date 
the previous year. These figures give some indication of the 
increase in demand for common victualer licenses. The fact 
that the license costs nothing makes it too often of no value in 
the opinion of the holder, who feels little responsibility for the 
conduct of the place, and too frequently uses his business as a 
cloak for illegal liquor selling. The Board earnestly renews 
its recommendation that it should be permitted to impose a 
license fee of not less than $2. 

Eeuit Sellers. 
In its report for 1907 the Board asked for legislation en- 
abling it to license fruit stores to be open on Sunday for the sale 
of fruit, believing that many of the licensed victualers were 



10 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



using their license simply as a subterfuge, and also that li- 
censing the sale of fruit and kindred articles on Sundays, under 
proper restrictions, would avoid the constant violation of the 
law. This legislation was refused, and during the year com- 
mon victualer licenses were granted, as was customary, on 
favorable reports of the police as to the proper equipment of 
places at the time of examination, although in many cases it 
was suspected that the principal business was to be the sale 
of fruit. 

During the year, from personal observation, the Board found 
that many of the licensed victualers, having obtained their 
licenses, made no pretense of keeping either facilities for pre- 
paring food or food to serve, and recently it has requested of 
the police department a report of the conditions obtaining in 
all doubtful licensed common victualer establishments. 

So large a part of our population is either foreign born or 
of foreign parentage, and is so accustomed to the use of fruit 
as food and has so limited opportunities for keeping the same 
in their own homes, that the Board believes that the licensing 
of fruit stores will be not only a benefit to a great part of the 
population but will be an aid to the better order and conduct 
of the city, and will do away with the subterfuges now prac- 
tised by those who wish to sell fruit on Sundays. It must not 
be forgotten that those who purchase fruit on Sundays and 
carry it away to be eaten elsewhere are in effect violating the 
law. Furthermore, how can we expect these newcomers, un- 
acquainted with our language and strangers to our laws and 
customs, to have res}:)€ct for any of our laws when they learn 
the ease with which our Sunday laws may be evaded ? The 
Board believes that the selling of fruit is more beneficial to 
the community than the sales of many articles now permitted, 
and therefore earnestly renews its recommendation of last year, 
that an act be passed authorizing the granting of licenses to 
persons to keep their stores open on Sunday for the sale of 
fruit and kindred articles, and to charge a fee of not less than 
$2 for such licenses. 

As the Board anticipates that there might be a strong objec- 
tion to licensing such stores in towns and smaller cities, with 
the conditions of which it is not familiar, it suggests that the 
jx^rmission should apply only to the city of Boston. 



1908.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 



11 



In General. 

The Board renews its recommendation that provision should 
be made by law for offices in some location other than that 
provided by the Police Commissioner in the present building, 
as it believes that the present quarters are not adequate for 
the proper transaction of its business." 

Those who have had occasion to visit the Board the past year 
know only too well the poor accommodations the Board has for 
receiving the public, which comes for information or other 
purposes. It has no waiting room, and frequently 50 to 100 
visitors, some of whom are women, are obliged to stand in the 
corridor, formerly the hall of an old-fashioned dwelling-house, 
which serves as a passageway to the offices of the police de- 
partment. 

The Board would also renew its recommendation of the 
passage of an act giving it authority to pay its secretary an 
annual salary not exceeding $3,500, as it has interpreted the 
law to mean that all fees previously retained by the secretary 
should be paid to the city." The secretary has thoroughly 
organized the office and introduced many improvements in its 
management. He is also held accountable for all the work of 
his assistants. Therefore the Board believes that an increased 
salary should be granted him, because of the superior excellence 
of his work and the special responsibilities of his position. 

The Board has discovered that several unlicensed persons, 
generally agents of dealers or manufacturers without the State, 
have been in the habit of selling to dealers and others in this 
city goods to be delivered from storage warehouses within the 
city. This custom seems to the Board to be an evasion of the 
law, and it recommends that remedial legislation be granted. 

Pool Rooms and Intelligence Offices. 
The Board hopes this year to make a thorough investigation 
of the conditions surrounding every pool room and intelligence 
office in the city. This investigation it was prevented from 
making this past year, owing to more imperative duties and to 
the reduction of its appropriation. 



12 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 1908. 



The Board has received from the Police Commissioner and 
from the officers and men of his department most cordial and 
ready aid in all its investigations, and a prompt response to 
all its inquiries, and it now takes this opportunity of express- 
ing its warm appreciation of the co-operation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EZRA H. BAKER, 
, FRED A. EMERY, 

SAM'L H. IIUDSO^^, 

Licensing Board. 



APPENDIX. 



APPENDIX. 



License Fees. 

As many requests have been made to the Board relative to 
when the license fees have been increased, as to the limit of 
the number of licensed places in the past, and as to when the 
law was changed in these cases, also as to the rebate law, the 
following is given for the information of the public. 

The license fees have been increased in 1886, 1889, 1895 
and 1908. Prior to 1885 there was no limit on the number 
of licensed places in the city of Boston. In 1888 the law 
established a limit upon the number of licenses in proportion 
to the population. In 1899 the law Avas amended, limiting 
the number of licensed places in the citv of Boston to 1,000. 
Prior to 1902 one licensee selling to another was not allowed 
any rebate, and in case of a transfer the new licensee paid a 
full fee. In 1902 the rebate law went into effect, which gave 
a rebate, at the discretion of the Board, to the seller, and al- 
lowed the purchaser to pay the proportionate part of the unex- 
pired term of the license year, provided the transfer was of 
the same class and in the same place. 

Complaints. 
Liquoi'. 

Three formal complaints were received again^^t liquor 
licensees during the past year. One of the complaints was 
withdrawn before a hearing was held ; 1 was dismissed for 
insufficient cause ; and 1 case was heard and the licensee was 
reprimanded. 

Chihs. 

Three club licenses were revoked during the past year. Two 
of them w^re for eamblinfi^, and 1 because the licensees had 
ceased to conduct the business in the place where they were 
licensed. 



16 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



Druggists. 

Three formal complaints and 1 report against druggists were 
received from the Police Commissioner during the past year, 
and action was taken as follows : — 

One declared forfeited ; specification, Violations of the 
conditions of his sixth-class drug license." 

One suspended ; specification, " Selling liquor or permitting 
liquor to be sold on the Lord's day." 

One suspended ; specification, " Unlawfully selling cocaine." 

One withdrawn by the Police Commissioner before a hear- 
ing was held. 

One license was declared void on notice from the Board of 
Registration in Pharmacy that the certificate of fitness issued 
to the licensee had been revoked by it. 



Rk.TKCTIOXS^ TrANSFEKS A^'D WlTIII)KAWAT,S. 





Rejected. 


Transferred. 


Withdrawn. 


Lifiuor applications, 


24 


71 


17 


Club applications, .... 


4 


2 


1 


Drug applications, 


8 


4 


3 



Of the 71 liquor licenses transferred during the year, 54 
were for alteration or extension of premises and 17 were for 
change of location. 

Two club licenses were transferred from one location to 
another. 

Nine sixth-class drug licenses were cancelled and 4 trans- 
ferred during the year. 

Licenses for tjie Sale of Intoxicating Liquor. 
The law licensing the sale of intoxicating liquor in this city 
provides that not more than one place shall be licensed for each 
500 of the population, as ascertained by the last njltional or 
State census, nor shall the number of places in any event ex- 
ceed 1,000. 



1908.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 



17 



Table 1. — Number of Places licensed. 
Number of places licensed during the year/ .... 973 
Number of licenses pending, . . .11 

Number of licenses surrendered for cancellation, . .78 
Number of new licenses granted in their places, . .78 

The following is a classified list of the licensed places in force 
Nov. 30, .1908: — 

First-class innholder, ........ 78 

First-class \ictualer, ......... 690 

Second-class victualer, ........ 6 

Fourth-class distiller, ......... 2 

Fourth-class wholesale dealer, "R," ...... 102 

Fourth-class grocer, ......... 67 

Fourth-class wholesale druggist, ....... 6 

Fifth-class brewer, ......... 20 

Total, . . 971 

Sixth-class licenses, ......... 208 

Seventh-class hcenses, . . . . . .11 

Club licenses, .......... 43 



Total, . . . 262 



The statutes provide for seven classes of licenses. 
The number of licenses granted under the classification of 
statute are as follows : — 



Table 2. — Number of Licenses issued. 




First class, ......... 


770 


Second class, ......... 


6 


Fourth class, ......... 


917 


Fifth class, ......... 


85 


Sixth class, ......... 


. 208 


Seventh class, ........ 


11 


Total, 


. n,997 


Special club, ......... 


43 


Special 12 o'clock pri\'ileges, ...... 


27 



Of the places licensed, 2 are not in force, as they have not been paid for. 
One first class and one fourth class granted but not paid for. 



18 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



Table 3. — Distribution of Licenses by Districts and Population. 

fPopulatioD, decennial censTis of 1905, 595,380.] 



District. 


Population. 


Licensed Places. 


Boston proper, 


166,428 


584 including 399 saloons. 


Roxbur}', .... 


102,180 


140 




99 


South Boston, 


64,091 


81 




t ■ v 


Charlestown, . 


39,983 


74 






East Boston, .... 


51,334 


41 




34 


West Roxbiir>', 


54,179 


27 


It 


16 


Brighton, .... 


21,806 


12 


it 


9 


Dorchester, .... 


95,379 


12 




6 






971 




690 



Boston proper has 1 license to every 285 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to 
ever>' 417. 

Roxbur>- has 1 hcense to every 729 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to every 
1,032—. 

South Boston has 1 Hcense to ever\' 791 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to 
ever>- 942 + . 

Chariest owTi has 1 hcense to every 540 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to 
every 677 + . 

East Boston has 1 hcense to everj- 1,252 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to 
ever>' 1,509 + . 

West Roxbmy- has 1 hcense to every 2,006 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to 
ever>' 3,386. 

Brighton has 1 hcense to even,' 1,817 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to every 
2,422 + . 

Dorchester has 1 hcense to every 7,948 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to 
every 15,896 + . 

Licensed Places. 



District. 


Innholders. 


Saloons. 


Grocers. 


Other 
Classes. 


Total. 


Boston proper. 


68 


399 


28 


89 


584 


Roxbur\% 


2 


99 


19 


20 


140 


South Boston, 


1 


68 


1 


11 


81 


Charlestown, 


2 


59 


7 


6 


74 


East Boston, 


2 


34 


3 


2 


41 


West Roxbun*', 


1 


16 


4 


6 


27 


Brighton, 


2 


9 




1 


12 


Dorchester, . 




6 


5 


1 


12 


Totals, . 


78 


690 


67 


136 


971 



1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 19 



Table 4. — Number of Licensed Places by Wards. 



Ward. 


First-class 
Innholder. 


First-class 
Victualer. 


Second-class 
Victualer. 


CD 
CO 

o ^ 


Fourth-class 
Grocer. 


x 

"o .£ 
t.2 


Fourth-class 
Druggist. 


Fifth-class 
Brewer. 


1 











9 








9 


9 


9^ 
zo 




9 
z 


1 
1 








Q 
o, 


1 

1 


1 1 

1 1 






9 
Z 








A 




99 
ZZ 




4 








Z 


0, 


1 

1 


9fi 
zu 






r: 
O 








a 
\j, 


1 £7 


141 
111 


Q 

o 


9Q 

Zi7 


9 
z 


7 
1 


c 
O 




7 


99 
zz 


1 9R 
IZD 




oo 


7 




1 
1 




c 
o, 


O 






7 
< 










Q 
J, 




49 
^z 




9 










xyj, 


Q 


Q 


9 
z 


4 


n 

;j 








11, 


ft 
o 


I i 






9 

z 








19 


3 


16 


- 


2 


4 




- 


- 


1*? 




43 




A 

o 




_ 




1 


14 
1^, 


1 


11 


: 


1 

1 


_ 


1 
i 






1 '^i 

lO, 




12 




1 

1 


1 






1 


10, 




5 






3 








17, 


1 


24 




2 


3 


- 




1 


18, 


1 


33 




2 


4 








19, 




26 




1 


5 


_ 




12 


20, 




5 




1 


1 








21, 




4 






2 








22, 




16 




4 


2 






2 


23, 


1 


9 


1 




4 






1 


24, 




1 






4 








25, 


2 


9 




1 










Totals, . 


78 


690 


6 


102 


67 


2 


6 


20 



Table 5. — Number of Licenses, paid and unpaid, from May 1 to 

Dec. 1, 1908. 

Granted and paid for: — 



First-class innholder. 


77 at $2,000, 


S154,000 


00 


First-class innholder. 


1 


900, 


900 


00 


First-class \^ctualer. 


691 


1,100, 


760,100 


00 


Second-class victualer, . 


6 


500, 


3,000 


00 


Fourth-class grocer. 


70 


1,000, 


70,000 


00 


Fourth-class wholesale dealer, 










''A,- . . . . 


681 


300, 


204,300 


00 


Fourth-class wholesale dealer, 










"B," . . . . 


157 


1,000, 


157,000 


00 


Fourth-class druggist, . 


6 


500, 


3,000 


00 


Fourth-class distiller, . 


2 


1,000, 


2,000 


00 


Fifth-class brewer, 


20 


1,000, 


20,000 


00 


Fifth-class bottler. 


65 


500, 


32,500 


00 


12 o'clock privilege. 


27 


500, 


13,500 


00 



$1,420,300 00 



Amount carried forward, 



$1,420,300 00 



20 LICENSING BOARD. 




[Dec. 


Amount brought forward, 






$1,420,300 00 


Granted but not paid for : — 








First-class victualer, . . 1 1,100 


SI, 100 00 




Fourth-class grocer, ..1 1 ,000, 


1,000 00 










2,100 00 




1,805 






$1,422,400 00 


rr\ /-» XT T C 

Table 6. — Number of Licenses, Single 


and 


IN Conjunction, paid 


AND UNPAID, FROM MaY 1 TO 


Dec. 


1, 1908. 




Single : — 








First-class victualer, .... 


14 at $1,100, 


$15,400 00 


kJTCL-UllLldCloo \ IC L lidlCi ^ .... 


5 


500, 


2,500 00 


i; irot-Lldoo lllllllUlUcr, .... 


5 


2,000, 


10,000 00 


r ouriiA-cicibo grocer, .... 


66 


1,000, 


66,000 00 


r ouriii-Lid,bs \\ xioit3bdie ciedicr, £>, 


72 


1,000, 


72,000 00 


TTr^iiyf n r>l q cc ix^'Vir^loGQlo H'pnfrfric'f 
T UU.I LXl-Lldbb WllUlcbcllc U.1 Ugglot, 


6 


500, 


3,000 00 


I; UUrill-Clclfeb tlloLllicI, .... 


2 


1,000, 


2,000 00 


rTlT^ rl— r» 1 Q GG i\T*0^X70T* 

X 11 til LJldoo Lllt/Wcl, . • • • 


13 


1,000, 


13,000 00 


In conjunction: — 








First-class innholder and fourth-class 








wholesale dealer, ''A," 


46 


2,300, 


105,800 00 


First-class innholder, fourth-class whole- 








sale dealer, "A" and 12 o'clock privi- 








lege, 


16 


2,800, 


44,800 00 


First-class innholder and 12 o'clock privi- 








lege, 


11 


2,500, 


27,500 00 


First-class victualer and fourth-class 








wholesale dealer, "A," . . 619 


1,400, 


866,600 00 


First-class victualer and fourth-class 








wholesale dealer, ''B," 


31 


2,100, 


65,100 00 


First-class victualer, fourth-class whole- 








sale dealer, "B," and fifth-class bottler. 


25 


2,600, 


65,000 00 


First-class victualer and fourth-class 








grocer, ...... 


2 


2,100, 


4,200 00 


Second-class victualer and fifth-class 








bottler, . ... 


1 


1,000, 


1,000 00 


Fourth-class wholesale dealer, "B," and 








fifth-class bottler, .... 


30 


1,500, 


45,000 00 


Fourth-class grocer and fifth-class bottler. 


2 


1,500, 


3,000 00 


Fifth-class brewer and fifth-class bottler, 


7 


1,500, 


10,500 00 



973 $1,422,400 00 

1 first-class victualer not paid, $1,100. 
1 fourth-class grocer not paid, $1,000. 



1908.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 74. 



21 



Tahle 7. 

1875- 76, 

1876- 77, 

1877- 78, 

1878- 79, 

1879- 80, 

1880- 81, 

1881- 82, 

1882- 83, 

1883- 84, 

1884- 85, 

1885- 86, 

1886- 87, 

1887- 88, 

1888- 89, 

1889- 90, 

1890- 91, 

1891- 92, 

1892- 93, 

1893- 94, 

1894- 95, 

1895- 96, 



Liquor License Fees from 1875 to 1908, taken- fr()m the 
City Auditor's Reports. 

$250,478 00 
173,323 50 
274,866 00 
223,388 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



242,474 
260,838 
258,865 
282,427 
305,551 
521,178 
511,830 00 
605,569 00 
587,742 00 
616,949 00 
891,668 00 
1,013,515 00 
1,036,564 00 
1,056,145 00 
1,062,838 00 
1,092,037 00 
1,196,640 00 



The above amounts (from February 1 to January 31 of 
each year) are the gross receipts, as shown by the auditor's 
reports. There should be deducted from these amounts 25 
per cent., which is due the State. 



Year. 



Amount received. 



Refunds. 



State's 
Proportion. 



Balance to City. 



Sl,451,195 00 
1,457,536 00 
1,480,668 00 
1,482,077 00 
1,477,569 00 
1,437,281 00 
1,425,581 74 
1,440,086 72 
1,441,767 12 
1,462,831 70 
1,486,828 19 
1,498,128 46 



11,400 
687 

6,919 

2,318 
18,333 

7,800 
13,775 
38,866 
46,363 
47,383 
48,509 22 
58,681 88 



00 
50 
78 
22 
33 
00 
83 
14 
12 
80 



$362,448 75 
364,212 12 
361,366 50 
377,103 58 
364,808 92 
357,370 25 
353,204 24 
350,231 75 
348,630 28 
353,903 36 
359,636 00 
359,861 64 



$1,087,346 25 
1,092,636 38 
1,112,381 72 
1,102,655 20 
1,094,426 75 
1,072,110 75 
1,058.601 67 
1,050,988 83 
1,046,773 72 
1,061.544 54 
1,078,682 97 
1,079,584 94 



22 LICENSING BOARD. [Dec. 



Table 8. — Liquor License Fees from 1885 to 1908, taken from the 
Records in this Office. 



Date. 


Amount. 




Licensed Places. 


Dec. 1, 


1885, to Dec. 1, 


1886, . 


$o08,113 


00 


2,289 


Dec. 1, 


1886, to Dec. 1, 


1887, . 


coo AOf\ 

588,480 


00 


1,863 


Dec. 1, 


1887, to Dec. 1, 


1888, . 


621,574 


00 


1,711 


Dec. 1, 


1888, to Dec. 1, 


1889, . 


ooo or»o 

888,308 


00 


1,568 


Dec. 1, 


1889, to Dec. 1, 


1890, . 


1,01d,oOO 


00 


807 


Dec. 1, 


1890, to Dec. 1, 


1891, . 


1 ,Uoo,o7z 


00 


ooo 

892 


Dec. 1, 


1891, to Dec. 1, 


1892, . 


l,Uoo,14o 


00 


oo/? 

896 


Dec. 1, 


1892, to Dec. 1, 


1893, . 


1,054,033 


00 


00£> 

896 


Dec. 1, 


1893, to Dec. 1, 


1894, . 


1 r»o 4 1 C\A 

1,084,194 


00 


896 


Dec. 1, 


1894, to Dec. 1, 


1895, . 


1,192,989 


00 


oo/? 

896 


Dec. 1, 


1895, to Dec. 1, 


1896, . 


1 4 A'7 ir\f\£i 

1,447,096 


00 


896 


Dec. 1, 


1896, to Dec. 1, 


1897, . 


l,4o7,23o 


00 


993 


Dec. 1, 


1897, to D^c. 1, 


1898, . 


1 A an 1 "7 1 
l,4oV>, 171 


00 


ooo 

992 


Dec. 1, 


1898, to Dec. 1, 


1899, . 


1,4S9,575 


00 


ooo 

992 


Dec. 1, 


1899, to Dec. 1, 


1900, . 


1,488,468 


00 


989 


Dec. 1, 


1900, to Dec. 1, 


1901, . 


1 439 684 


00 


986 


Dec. 1, 


1901, to Dec. 1, 


1902, . 


1,426,608 


27 


980 


Dec. 1, 


1902, to Dec. 1, 


1903, . 


1,440,237 


95 


979 


Dec. 1, 


1903, to Dec. 1, 


1904, . 


1,438,132 


16 


980 


Dec. 1, 


1904, to Dec. 1, 


1905, . 


1,455,681 


50 


980 


Dec. 1, 


1905, to Dec. 1, 


1906, . 


1,480,749 


00 


980 


Dec. 1, 


1906, to Dec. 1, 


1907, . 


1,509,894 


70 


974 


Dec. 1, 


1907, to Dec. 1, 


1908, . 


1,509,306 


03 


973 



Table 9. — Number of Licenses issued and Amount paid into the 

Treasury. 

From Dec. 1, 1907, to Dec. 1, 1908, for Full Year. 



78 first-class innholders, at $2,000, 
692 first-class victualers, at $1,100, 
6 second-class victualers, at $500, 
683 fourth-class wholesale dealers, 

$300, .... 
157 fourth-class wholesale dealers, 

$1,000, .... 
70 fourth-class grocers, at $1,000, 
2 fourth-class distillers, at $1,000, 
6 fourth-class vvholesale druggists, 
20 fifth-class brewers, at $1,000, 
65 fifth-class bottlers, at $500, . 

1 club, at $300, 
46 clubs, at $500, . 
225 sixth-class druggists, at $1, . 
11 seventh-class alcohols, at $1, 



at 



at 



at 



$500 



$156,000 00 
761,200 00 
3,000 00 

204,900 00 

157,000 00 
70,000 00 
2,000 00 
3,000 00 
20,000 00 
32,500 00 
300 00 
23,000 00 
225 00 
11 00 



$1,433,136 00 



1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 



23 



From Dec. 1, 1907, to Dec. 1, 1908, for Part of Year. 
2 first-class innholders, .... $1,699 88 
67 first-class victualers, .... 43,190 99 
66 fourth-class wholesale dealers, "A," 11,610 29 

6 fourth-class wholesale dealers, "B," . 3,077 32 
4 fourth-class grocers, .... 2,091 55 

2 special 12 o'clock liquor privileges, at 
$500, from Dec. 1, 1907, to May 1, 

1908,^ $1,000 00 

27 special 12 o'clock Uquor privileges, for 

the full year, expiring April 30, 1909, . 13,500 00 

Total. 



$61,670 03 



14,500 00 
$1,509,306 03 



Table 10. — Rebates. 
Seventy-eight licenses have been surrendered for cancellation 
and new licenses issued in their place. ^ATiere this was done 
rebates have been granted to the licensees surrendering. 



Rebates granted, .... 
Less 1 rebate granted but not paid for, 

Total, 

Total revenue for liquor licenses, 
Less rebates, .... 



$60,963 19 
625 15 



$60,338 04 

$1,509,306 03 
60,338 04 



$1,448,967 99 

Miscellaneous Licenses. 

Table 1. — Common Victualers and Innholders. 
Common Victualers without Liquor. 



Apphcations granted. 
Places licensed, 
Rejected, 
Transferred, . 
Cancelled, 
Revoked, 



2,107 
1,704 
258 
51 
391 
12 



Of the common victualers' licenses granted, 20 were for lunch carts. 



Innholders without Liquor. 



Applications granted. 
Places licensed, 
Rejected, 
Cancelled, 



15 
13 
1 

9 



* Two granted for balance of license year 1907-08, expiring April 30, 1908. 



24 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



Table 2. — Billiard, Pool and Sippio Tables, and Bowling Alleys. 

Applications granted, ........ 412 

Places licensed, ......... 347 

Rejected, 122 

Transferred, .......... 11 

Cancelled, 42 

Revoked, .......... 15 

Withdrawn, .......... 25 

Fees collected, . . S3, 842 

Number of Tables and Alleys. 

BilUards, . . 292 

Pool, .... 1,189 

Sippio, ... . ..... 5 

Bowling alleys, ......... 435 

The fee is $2 for each table and alley. 

Table 3. — Intelligence Offices. 
Applications granted, . . . . . . . .122 

Places Hcensed, . . . . . . . . .100 

Rejected, .......... 10 

Transferred, .......... 10 

Cancelled, .......... 1 

Fees collected, $4,100 

Of the appHcations granted : — 

44 were first class, at $50, $2,200 

78 were second class, at $25, ..... 1,950 

$4,150 

1 first-class license cancelled, ....... 50 



$4,100 

\ 'i Table 4. — Miscellaneous. 

Skating Rinks. 

Applications granted, ........ 1 

Fees collected, ......... $5 

Total amount received and paid into the city treasury on account 

of miscellaneous Ucenses, ....... $7,947 

Picnic Groves. 

Applications granted, ........ 3 

Places licensed, .......... 3 

Drivers' Permits. 

Granted, 862 

Rejected, .......... 16 

Cancelled, 49 

Revoked, .......... 2 



1908.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 



25 



Drivers' cards were formerly good until revoked. Now the 
drivers' cards expire September 1 of each year and must be 
renewed upon their expiration. 



Comparisons. 

Table 1. — Receipts and Expenditures, Account of Licenses. 





1906-07. 


1907-08. 


1908-09. 


Liquor licenses. 
Rebates, 


$1,480,749 00 
49,801 35 


$1,509,894 70 $1,509,306 03 
56,441 71 1 60,338 04 


Miscellaneous licenses, 


$1,430,947 65 
7,263 00 


$1,453,452 99 |$1,448,967 99 
7,093 00 7,947 00 


Total, 


$1,438,210 65 $1,460,545 99 


$1,456,914 99 



Table 2. — Licenses. 





1906-07. 


1907-08. 


1908-09. 


First-class innholder, .... 


71 


78 


78 


First-class victualer, .... 


694 


690 


690 


Second-class ^actualer. 


9 


7 


6 


Fourth-class distiller, .... 


2 


2 


2 


Fourth-class wholesale dealer, "B," 
Fourth-class grocer, .... 


99 


95 


102 


74 


74 


67 


Fourth-class wholesale druggist, . 


6 


6 


6 


Fifth-class brewer, .... 


21 


21 


20 




976 


973 


971 


Sixth-class druggist, .... 


225 


224 


208 


Seventh-class alcohol, .... 


20 


14 


11 


Clubs, 


52 


50 


43 




297 


288 


262 



Common Victualers. 



Applications granted, .... 


1,777 


1,585 


2,107 


Places hcensed, ..... 


1,489 


1,426 


1,704 


Rejected, ...... 


195 


125 


258 


Cancelled, ...... 


282 


153 


391 


Revoked, ...... 


6 


6 


12 


Transferred, ..... 


52 


22 


51 



26 LICENSING BO.AJID. [Deo. 



Innholders. 





190»-07. 


l»07-0is>. 




Applications granted, .... 


11 


14 


15 


Places licensed, ..... 


11 


13 


13 


Rejected, ..... 


2 




1 


Cancelled, ..... 




1 


2 


Billiard, Pool and Sippio Tables, and Bowling Alleys. 


Applications granted, .... 


418 


406 


412 


Places licensed, ..... 


314 


324 


347 


Rejected, ...... 


48 


54 


122 


Transferred, ..... 


16 


16 


11 


Cancelled, ...... 


37 


34 


42 


Revoked, ..... 


9 


10 


15 


Intelligence Offlces. 


Applications granted, .... 


115 


107 


122 


Places licensed, ..... 


98 


89 


100 


Rejected, ...... 


7 


5 


10 


Transferred, .... 


20 


5 


10 


Cancelled, ..... 


7 


4 


1 


Revoked, ...... 


1 






Skating Rin 


ks. 






.\pplications granted, .... 


3 


1 


1 


Places licensed, ..... 


3 


1 


1 


Rejected, ...... 


1 






Picnic Groves. 


Applications granted, .... 


11 


3 


3 


Places licensed, ..... 


9 


2 


3 


Rejected, ..... 


2 


1 




Drivers' Permits. 


Granted, ...... 


111 


200 


S62 


Rejected, .... 


10 


13 


16 


Cancelled, ...... 


14 


46 


49 


Revoked, 


2 


1 


2 



1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 27 



License Fees as fixed by the Board for the Year 1908-09. 

The fees for licenses were fixed at the following rates for 
the year commencing May 1, 1008, and ending April 30, 
1909, viz. : — 

For licenses of the first class, to sell all kinds of liquor, to be 
drunk on the premises : — 

Innholders, S2,000 GO 

Privilege to serve liquors to midnight (innholders), . 500 00 

Common victualers, ....... 1,100 00 

For licenses of the second class, to sell malt liquors, cider and 
light wines, containing not more than 15 per centum of 
alcohol, to be drunk on the premises: — 

Common \'ictualers, ....... 500 00 

For Hcenses of the fourth class, to sell all kinds of liquor and to 
bottle distilled liquors, not to be drunk on the premises:. — 

WTiolesale druggists, ....... 500 00 

Grocers, . 1,000 00 

Wholesale dealers, *'A," issued only in conjunction \vith 

a first-class hcense, ....... 300 00 

Wholesale dealers, ''B," 1,000 00 

Distillers, 1,000 00 

For hcenses of the fifth class, to sell malt hquors, cider and 
light wines, containing not more than 15 per centum of 
alcohol, not to be drunk on the premises : — 

Bottlers, issued only in conjunction with another license, 500 00 

Brewers, 1,000 00 

For a license of the sixth class, to druggists, . . . 1 00 

For a hcense of the seventh class, to sell pure alcohol, . . 1 00 

For a club license, ........ 500 00 



Public Document 



No. 74 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Licensing Board for the City 
OF Boston. 



December, 1909. 




BOSTON: 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1910. 



Public Document 



No. 74 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THK 

Licensing Board for the City 
OF Boston. 



December, 1909. 




BOSTON : 

WEIGHT & POTTEK FEINTING CO., STATE PEINTEES, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1910. 



Approved by 
The State Bo.vrd of Publication. 



®l)c Commonioealtl) of iila5sacl)U0ett0. 



REPORT. 



Licensing Board for the City of Boston, 

29 Pemberton Square, Dec. 29, 1909. 

To His Excellency Eben S. Draper, Governor, Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts. 

Sir: — As required by section 5, chapter 291 of the Acts 
of 190(), the Licensino' Board for the City of Boston has the 
honor to present its fourth annual report. 

The Board has from the beginning acted upon the assump- 
tion that in the performance of its duties it should regard the 
interests of the whole city, and not those of any one section 
at the expense of the others. 

The Board has stated that one of its most important policies 
is the non-increase under present conditions of the number of 
licensed places in South Boston, Charlestown, East Boston, in 
the vicinity of the North Station and in certain parts of Rox- 
bury, and the non-increase of saloon licenses in close proximity 
to subway entrances and exits and transfer stations. This 
policy the Board has followed for the past year, and will con- 
tinue to folloAV. It will continue also the three other policies 
stated in the last annual report, which, from its experience, it 
thinks especially important, namely : — 

The restriction of lic^uor licenses, especially saloons, to business neigh- 
borhoods and main thoroughfares. 

The restriction of drinking by women to hotels and restaurants. 

The granting of all new licenses controlled by this Board only to bona 
fide citizens of Boston. 

During the past year, as in former years, no grocer's license 
granted in suburban districts has been changed into a saloon 
license, nor have the privileges of licensees in those locations 
been increased. 



4 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



In its selection of business neighborhoods and main thor- 
oughfares, the Board at times arouses opposition from residents 
of the neighborhood who claim that their district is purely 
residential, although in other matters, such as demands for 
public improvements, the laying out of new streets, etc., 
urgent pleas are often made that the neighborhoods haye be- 
come largely business sections. The Board is constantly im- 
portuned to grant locations in suburban and other residential 
districts. The greater part of these applications are refused 
without any knowledge on the part of the public, and only a 
very few that seem entirely justified are allowed to be adver- 
tised. Of those advertised, not all have been granted. 

From occasional published statements it is evident to the 
Board that many citizens have an exaggemted idea of the num- 
ber of licensed places open to women for drinking. In the city 
of Boston, with a population of over 600,000, there are at the 
present time 970 licensed liquor places of all kinds. There are 
79 hotels licensed to sell liquor in which women may be served, 
and in addition there are 91 licensed places, including all restau- 
rants and cafes, in which it is possible for women, with the 
permission of the Board, to obtain liquor to be drunk on the 
premises. In other words, there is a possible total of 170 
licensed places (1 for every 3,500 of the population) where 
women may obtain liquor to be drunk on the premises. In 
addition to the residents of Boston, those of neighboring cities 
and towns supply no small part of the patronage of these places. 

Complaints. 

Twenty-nine complaints were received against licensees, with 
the following results : — 

Liquor, 

Dismissed, not proven, ........ 3 

Forfeited, proven, ......... 1 

No action necessary, ......... 2 

No action, case pending in court, ...... 1 

Not proven, but restriction imposed, ...... 2 

Placed on file, .......... 1 

Suspended, charges proven, .10 
Withdrawn, .......... 4 



24 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 



5 



Common Victiuder, 
Dismissed, not proven, ........ 1 

Diniggist. 

Forfeited, charges sustained, ....... 1 

Intelligence Offices. 
Forfeited, charges sustained, ....... 2 

Cluhs. 

One club license was revoked on the complaint of the i)()lice 
that gambling was permitted on the premises. 

In addition, the Board has held with different persons, from 
Dec. 1, 1908, to Nov. 30, 1909, inclusive, 1,(581 conferences, 
covering the different activities of the Board. 

In its report for 1908 the Board stated that under the author- 
ity given by an act of the Legislature of 1908 it was prepared 
to give hearings on complaints brought either by the police 
department or by private parties, and to suspend licenses in 
cases where charges were proven. In consequence, several 
hearings have been held on complaints made by orgTinizations 
or citizens. The Board feels obliged to make the comment that 
in too many instances the cases have been badly prepared, and 
that too often the complainants have expected that their ex parte 
statements should be accepted without question or examination. 
As a result, the decisions of the Board in some cases have been 
resented, its action misrepresented and its confidence abused by 
disappointed complainants. In marked contrast, the Board is 
glad to report, was one complainant, a clergyman, the official 
of an organization, who by his courtesy and fairness aided the. 
Board to correct off'ences, while at the same time winning the 
respect of the defendants. 

The Board has been surprised by the readiness with which 
some doubtless well-meaning officials of organizations depend- 
ent upon public subscriptions have employed men to secure 
evidence by committing off*ences against decency, if not in 
violation of the law. 

Rebates. 

The Board's decision to refuse all rebates except in case of 
death or for some other imperative reason has resulted in a 



6 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



material saving to the city, and tends, the Board believes, to 
establish a more permanent body of licensees. Attention is 
called to Table 1 of liquor comparisons, on page 24, showing 
the increase in the total receipts from fees and the decrease in 
the number of licensed places. 

Druggists' Licenses. 
The Board still believes that the present law, authorizing 
druggists for a license fee of $1 to sell intoxicating liquors on 
the statement of the purchasers that such liquors are desired 
for medicinal, mechanical or chemical purposes, should be so 
amended that druggists shall sell alcoholic liquors — except 
pure alcohol — only on physicians' prescriptions. The records 
of hospitals, the testimony of physicians and the admission of 
druggists themselves show that alcoholic licjuors are used with 
ever-decreasing frequency in sickness, and that therefore the 
necessity of the present form of druggists' licenses no longer 
exists. Many of the Boston druggists have expressed to the 
Board their dislike of the liquor side of their business, and in 
some cases have consented to sell only on physicians' prescrip- 
tions. In suburban districts where, from the absence of some 
form of liquor license, the demand for liquor from drug stores 
is very noticeable, the Board has been repeatedly urged by 
citizens of repute to grant druggists' licenses, even where re- 
ports made to the Board have shown an undue amount of sales : 
such is the case especially in suburban districts adjoining no- 
license towns or cities. The continuance of the present system 
is, in the opinion of the Board, a distinct hindrance to a perma- 
nent improvement of the liquor traffic, inducing as it does con- 
tempt for the law and encouraging In pocrisy and deceit. The 
Board earnestly recommends that, with the exception of pure 
alcohol, now so commonly used in sickness, no liquor shall be 
sold by druggists except on physicians' prescriptions. For the 
sale of pure alcohol it again recommends a special license, with 
an annual fee not to exceed $10. If it be deemed unwise to 
restrict druggists in accordance with the Board's recommenda- 
tions, then the Board asks that it be alloAved to fix the annual 
fee for druggists' licenses at some sum not exceeding $100. 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 



7 



Clubs. 

Constant requests are made of the Board for Club licenses. 
The policy of the Board is to grant no license except to clubs 
of good reputation, substantial membership, with a permanent 
home, — in brief, to clubs to which the license is only an in- 
cidental privilege, and not the main reason for their existence. 



Intelligence Offices. 
The Board is at present making a careful investigation into 
the management of intelligence offices, the results of which it 
hopes will give information of value. 

Fruit Licenses. 
Under the authority given by chapter 423 of the Acts of 
1909, the Board has issued licenses for the sale of fruit, ice 
cream, confectionery, etc., on Sunday. Believing that this 
act was passed primarily to correct the hardships entailed on 
common victualers by previous laws, the Board decided dur- 
ing the first year to grant the new license onl}" to common 
victualers, to those who in the past held common victualer 
licenses, or to such as had succeeded to the business of either 
class, in order that the effect of the law might be carefully 
observed. The result is as follows : — 



Fi'uit^ Ice Cream and Confectionery, 
Applications granted, 
Places licensed, 
Rejected, 
Transferred, . 
Cancelled, 
Revoked, 
Withdrawn, . 
Fees collected, 



Of the 343 licensed places, 208 hold in conjunction common 
victualer licenses ; but the total number of places having either 
a common victualer license or fruit license was, on Dec. 1, 
1909, 1,776, as against 1,704 having common victualer licenses 
Dec. 1 , 1908, before the passing of the act creating fruit licenses. 



8 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



The fee was fixed at $5, and the following conditions were 
imposed on those having the Sunday license : — 

Only actual residents of Boston will be granted the above licenses. 

The licensee must always be on the premises while open for business. 

Only those occupying stores, who sell on secular days the above-de- 
scribed articles, and whose reputation is favorably reported on by the 
police department, will receive licenses. 

The owners of fruit stands or temporary structures will not be licensed. 

No one whose principal business is the sale of articles other than those 
described will be granted a license. This will apply to the owners of 
grocery, stationery, delicatessen, provision or other stores. 

Licensees will be recjuired not to display on Sundays their wares be- 
yond the windows of their establishments. 

The Licensing Board will not hesitate to avail itself of the authority 
given it to suspend or revoke licenses, especially if the licensed premises 
attract noisy, disorderly or otherwise offensive people. 

During the coming year some redistribution of fruit and 
common victualer licenses will be necessary, in order to correct 
some evident inconsistencies resulting from the policy adopted. 

Common Victualer Licenses. 
The reasons stated in previous years for charging a fee for 
common victualer licenses seem to the Board as strong as ever. 
The labor of the police in investigating and reporting upon each 
application and in inspecting frequently the licensed premises, 
the labor of the clerks in preparing the licenses, and the cost 
of supplying to each licensee the pamphlet supplied by the 
State, justify, the Board believes, the charging of a license fee. 
The Board earnestly recommends that it be authorized to fix a 
license fee for common victualers, not to exceed that of the 
fruit, confectionery, etc., licenses. 

In General. 

We again take pleasure in expressing our appreciation of the 
faithful and efficient services of our secretary and the other 
employees of the office. 

The Board again recommends that remedial legislation be 
granted to control unlicensed persons, generally agents of 
dealers or manufacturers without the State, who sell to dealers 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 



9 



and others in this city liquors to be delivered from warehouses 
within this city. 

It would also recommend legislation compelling proprietors 
of storage warehouses to report to the Licensing Board the 
names and addresses of all persons storing liquor in the said 
warehouses. 

The co-operation of the C(mimissioner of Police and of the 
officers and men of his department with the work of the Board 
has been most cordial and eftective, and the Board is glad to 
take this opportunity of expressing its appreciation. 

Ever}^ action of the Board has been determined by the unani- 
mous approval of the three members. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EZRA H. BAKER, 
FRED A. EMERY, 
SAM'L H. HUDSON, 

Licensing Board for the City of Boston. 



APPENDIX. 



APPENDIX. 



Licenses for the Sale of Intoxicating Liquor. 
The law licensing the sale of intoxicating liquor in this city 
provides that not more than one place shall be licensed for each 
500 of the population, as ascertained by the last national or State 
census, nor shall the number of places in any event exceed 



1,000. 

Table 1. — Number of Places licensed. 
Number of places granted during the year,^ .... 974 
Number of licenses pending, . . . . .10 

Number of licenses surrendered for cancellation, .... 50 
Number of new licenses granted in their places, .... 50 

The following is a classified list of the licensed places in 
force Nov. 30, 1909 : — 

First-class innholder, ........ 79 

First-class victualer, . . . . . . . .691 

Second-class victualer, ........ 6 

Fourth-class distiller, . . ...... 2 

Fourth-class wholesale dealer, "B," ...... 104 

Fourth-class grocer, ........ 82 

Fourth-class wholesale druggist, ...... 6 

Fifth-class brewer, . . . . . . . . .20 



Total, 970 

Sixth-class licenses, . . . . . . . . .195 

Seventh-class licenses, . . . . . . . .11 

Club licenses, .......... 43 



Total, 249 



' Three licensed places granted, licenses not paid for. One license was granted and recon- 
sidered, and rejected after the fee was paid. One license was granted in the same premises after 
the above rejection took place. 



14 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



The statutes provide for seven classes of licenses. 
The number of licenses issued under the classification of 
statute are as follows : — 

Table 2. — Number of Licenses issued from Dec. 1, 1908, to Dec 1, 



1909, FOR Full Year. 

First class, .......... 774 

Second class, .......... 6 

Fourth class, 920 

Fifth class, . . 81 

Sixth class, 208 

Seventh class, . . . , . . . . .11 

Total, . 2,000 

Special club, .......... 44 

Special 12 o'clock privilege, ....... 28 

Number of Licenses issued from Dec. 1, 1908, to Dec. 1, 1909, for Part of 

Year. 

First class, .......... 43 

Fourth class, .......... 47 

Fifth class, .......... 1 

Total, 91 

Special 12 o'clock privilege, ....... 1 



Table 3. — Distribution of Licenses by Districts and Population. 



[Population, Decennial Census of 1905,595, 380.) 



District. 


Population. 


Licensed Places. 


Boston proper. 


166,428 


589 


including 404 saloons. 


Roxbury, .... 


102,180 


136 


<< 


96 " 


South Boston, 


64,091 


80 


(( 


67 " 


Charlestown, 


39,983 


74 


u 


59 " 


East Boston, 


51,334 


41 


ii 


34 


West Roxbury, 


54,179 


26 


li 


16 " 


Brighton, .... 


21,806 


12 


u 


9 


Dorchester, 


95,379 


12 


n 


6 " 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 



15 



Boston proper has 1 license to every 283 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to 
every 412. 

Roxbury has 1 license to every 751 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to every 
1,064. 

South Boston has 1 license to every 801 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to 
every 956. 

Charlestown has 1 license to every 540 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to every 
677 + . 

East Boston has 1 license to every 1,252 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to 
every 1,509 + . 

West Roxbury has 1 license to every 2,084 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to 
every 3,386. 

Brighton has 1 license to every 1,817 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to every 
2,422 + . 

Dorchester has 1 license to every 7,948 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to ever\- 
15,896 + . 



Licensed Places. 



District. 


InnholderB. 


Saloons. 


Grocers. 


other 
Classes. 


Totals. 


Boston proper. 


69 


404 


26 


90 


589 


Roxbury, 


2 


96 


17 


21 


136 


South Boston, 


1 


67 


1 


11 


80 


Charlestown, 


2 


59 


7 


6 


74 














East Boston, 


2 


34 


3 


2 


41 


West Roxbur}', 


1 


16 


3 


6 


26 


Brighton, 


2 


9 




1 


12 


Dorchester, . 




6 


5 


1 


12 


Totals, . 


79 


691 


62 


138 


970 



16 LICENSING BOARD. [Dec. 



Table 4. — Number of Licensed Places by Wards. 



Wakd. 


Innholder. 


First-cIasB 
Victualler. 


Second-class 
Victualler. 


Fourth-class 
Grocer. 


Fourth-class 
Wholesale 
Dealer "B." 


Fourth-class 
Distiller. 


Fourth-class 
Druggist. 


Fifth-class 
Brewer. 


1 
H 


1, . . . 


_ 


9 


_ 


2 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


11 


2, . . . 


2 


25 


_ 


1 


2 


_ 


_ 


_ 


30 


3, . . . 


1 


11 


_ 


2 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


14 


4, . . . 


_ 


22 


_ 




4 


_ 


_ 


2 


28 


5, . . . 


1 


26 


_ 


5 




_ 


_ 




32 


6, . . . 


20 


143 


3 


2 


31 


1 


5 


_ 


205 


7, . . . 


21 


122 




6 


30 


_ 


1 


_ 


180 


8, . . . 


5 


52 


_ 


2 


8 


_ 




_ 


67 


9, . . . 


4 


38 


_ 


_ 


2 


_ 


_ 


_ 


44 


10, . . . 


10 


17. 


2 


9 


5 


_ 


_ 


_ 


43 


11, . . . 


6 


11 


_ 


2 




_ 


_ 


_ 


19 


12, . . . 


3 


21 


_ 


5 


2 


_ 


_ 


_ 


31 


13, . . . 




43 


- 




6 




- 


1 


50 


14, . . . 


1 


1 1 






1 


1 
1 






14 


15, . . . 




11 


- 


1 


1 




- 


1 


14 


16, . . . 




5 




3 










8 


17, . . . 


1 


23 




3 


2 






1 


30 


18, . . . 


1 


32 




4 


2 








39 


19 




26 




5 


1 






12 


44 


20, . . . 




5 




1 


1 








7 


21, . . . 




4 




1 


1 








6 


22, . . . 




15 




1 


4 






2 


22 


23, . . . 


1 


9 


1 


3 








1 


15 


24, . . . 




1 




4 










5 


25, . , . 


2 


9 






1 








12 


Totals, 


79 


691 


6 


62 


104 


2 


6 


20 


970 



Table 5. — Number of Licenses, paid and unpaid, from May 1 to 

Dec. 1, 1909. 



Granted and paid for: — 



First-class innholder, , 


79 at 


$2,000, $158,000 00 


First-class victualer, . 


692 


1,100, 


761,200 00 


Second-class victualer. 


6 


500, 


3,000 00 


Fourth-class grocer, 


64 


1,000, 


64,000 00 


Fourth-class wholesale dealer. 








"A," 


686 


300, 


205,800 00 


Fourth-class wholesale dealer. 








"B," .... 


159 


1,000, 


159,000 00 


Fourth-class wholesale dealer. 








"B," .... 


1 


700, 


700 00 



Amount carried forward, . . . $1,351,700 00 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 



17 



Amount brought forward, 




SI 


,351,700 


00 


Fourth-class druggist, . 


6 at 


$500, 


3,000 


00 


Fourth-class distiller, . 


2 


1,000, 


2,000 


00 


Fifth-class brewer. 


20 


1,000, 


20,000 


00 


Fifth-class bottler, 


61 


500, 


30,500 


00 


12 o'clock privilege. 


28 


500, 


14,000 


00 


Granted but not paid for : — 










First-class victualer, 


1 at 


SI, 100, 


$1,100 


00 


Fniirth-plflss OTCiOf^r 


2 


1 000 


2 000 


00 

\J\J 


Fourth-class wholesale dealer, 










''B," .... 


1 


1,000, 


1,000 


00 


Fifth-class bottler. 


1 


500, 


500 


00 



$1,421,200 00 



4,600 00 



$1,425,800 00 

Table 6. — Number of Licensed Places, Licenses Single and in 
Conjunction, paid and unpaid, from May 1 to Dec. 1, 1909. 



Single : — 



First-class victualer, .... 


12 at $1,100, 


$13,200 00 


Second-class victualer, .... 


5 


500, 


2,500 00 


First-class innholder, .... 


6 


2,000, 


12,000 00 


Fourth-class grocer, .... 


62 


1,000, 


62,000 00 


Fourth-class wholesale dealer, ''B," 


76 


1,000, 


76,000 00 


Fourth-class wholesale druggist. 


6 


500, 


3,000 00 


Fourth-class distiller, .... 


2 


1,000, 


2,000 00 


Fifth-class brewer, .... 


13 


1,000, 


13,000 00 


In conjunction: — 








First-class innholder and fourth-class 








wholesale dealer, "A," 


45 


2,300, 


103,500 00 


First-class innholder, fourth-class whole- 








sale dealer, "A, "and 12 o'clock privilege. 


18 


2,800, 


50,400 00 


First-class innholder and 12 o'clock privi- 








lege, 


10 


2,500, 


25,000 00 


First-class victualer and fourth-class whole- 








sale dealer, "A," 


623 


1,400, 


872,200 00 


First-class victualer and fourth-class whole- 








sale dealer, ''B," . . . . 


32 


2,100, 


67,200 00 


First-class victualer, fourth-class wholesale 








dealer, "B," and fifth-class bottler, 


24 


2,600, 


62,400 00 


Amount carried forward, . 






$1,364,400 00 



18 LICENSING BOARD. [Dec. 

Amount brought forward, .... $1,364,400 00 



rirsi-ciaSS wciudier diiu lourin-citiiss groLcr, 


9 nt 


*9 100 


d 900 


00 


Second-class victualer and fifth-class bot- 










tler, ....... 


1 
1 


1 ,uuu. 


1 ooo 


oo 
uu 


Fourth-class wholesale dealer, "B," and 










niin-ciHSS Doiiier, .... 




1 =iOO 


AO 000 


00 
uu 




2 


1,500, 


3,000 


00 


Fifth-class brewer and fifth-class bottler, . 


7 


1,500, 


10,500 


00 


Fourth-class wholesale dealer," A, "changed 


974 








to fourth-class wholesale dealer, "B," . 


1 


700, 


700 


00 



$1,425,800 00 

Table 7. — Liquor License Fees from 1885 to 1909, t.\ken from 
THE Records in This Office. 



Datk. 



1885, 
1886, 
1887, 
1888, 
1889, 
1890, 
1891, 
1892, 
1893, 
1894, 
1895, 
1896, 
1897, 
1898, 
1899, 
1900, 
1901, 
1902, 
1903, 
1904, 
1905, 
1906, 
1907, 
1908, 



to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 



to Dec 
to Dec 
to Dec 
to Dec 
to Dec 
to Dec 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 



1886, 
1887, 
1888, 
1889, 
1890, 
1891, 
1892, 
1893, 
1894, 
1895, 
1896, 
1897, 
1898, 
1899, 
1900, 
1901, 
1902, 
1903, 
1904, 
1905, 
1906, 
1907, 
1908, 
1909, 



Amount. 



$608,113 00 
588,480 00 
621,574 00 
888,308 00 
1,016,500 00 
1,033,872 00 
1,058,146 00 
1,064,033 00 
1,084,194 00 
1,192,989 00 
1,447,096 00 
1,457,235 00 
1,469,171 00 
1,489,575 00 
1,488,468 00 
1,439,684 00 
1,426,608 27 
1,440,237 95 
1,438,132 16 
1,455,681 50 
1,480,749 00 
1,509,894 70 
1,509,306 03 
1.480,709 80 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 74. 



19 



Table 8. — Number of Licenses issued and Amount paid into the 

Treasury. 



From Dec. 1, 1908, to Dec. 1, 1909, for Full Year. 



80 first-class innholders, at S2,000, 




$160,000 


00 


694 first-class victualers, at $1,100, 




763,400 


00 


6 second-class victualers, at $500, 




3,000 


00 


689 fourth-class wholesale dealers. 


"A," at 






$300, .... 




206,700 


00 


159 fourth-class wholesale dealers. 


"B," at 






$1,000, .... 




1.59,000 


00 


64 fourth-class grocers, at $1,000, 




64,000 


00 


2 fourth-class distillers, at $1,000, 




2,000 


00 


6 fourth-class wholesale druggists. 


at $500, 


3,000 


00 


20 fifth-class brewers, at $1,000, 




20,000 


00 


61 fifth-class bottlers, at $500, . 




30,500 


00 


44 clubs, at $500, . 




22,000 


00 


208 sixth-class druggists, at $1, . 




208 


00 


11 seventh-class alcohols, at $1, 




11 


00 



$1,433,819 00 



From Dec. 1, 1908, to Dec. 1, 1909, for Part of Year. 



4 first-class innholders, . 

39 first-class victualers, 

40 fourth-class wholesale dealers, "A," 
4 fourth-class wholesale dealers, "B," 
2 fourth-class grocers, 

1 fifth-class bottler, 

1 fourth-class druggist, . 



$4,133 11 

19,332 82 

5,433 36 

2,180 49 

1,008 31 

126 37 

176 34 



32,390 80 



1 special 12 o'clock licjuor privilege, at $500, 

from Dec. 1, 1908, to May 1, 1909, $500 00 
28 special 12 o'clock hquor privilege, for the 

full year, expiring April 30, 1910, 14,000 00 



14,500 00 



Total, $1,480,709 80 



Fifty licenses have been surrendered for cancellation and 
new licenses issued in their place. Rebates have been granted 
only in special cases. 



r 



20 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



Table 9. — Rebates. 

Rebates granted, $17,501 87 

Total revenue for lif4Uor licenses, $1,480,709 80 

Less rebates, ........ 17,501 87 



SI, 463. 207 93 



Miscellaneous Licenses. 
Table 1. — Common Victualers and Inn 
Common Victualers wiihout Liquor 



Applications granted, 
Places licensed, 
Rejected, 
Transferred, 
Cancelled, 
Revoked,* 
Withdrawn, 



holders. 



Of the common \'ictualers' hcenses granted, 21 were for lunch carts; 3 
were later cancelled. 

Innholders without Liquor. 
Apphcations granted, ........ 16 

Places licensed, ......... 14 

Revoked, 2 



Table 2. — Billl\rd, Pool and Sippio Tables, and Bowling Alley.s. 



Apphcations granted, ........ 445 

Places licensed, ......... 374 

Rejected, .......... 76 

Transferred, .......... 13 

Revoked, .......... 2 

Withdrawn, .......... 22 

Fees collected S4,004 



Number of Tables and Alleys. 

Billiards, 539 

Pool, 1,162 

Sippio, .......... 5 

Bowling alleys, ......... 296 

2,002 

The fee is $2 for each table and alley. 



1 Of the licenses revoked, 279 were granted prior to Dec. 1, 1908. 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 



21 



Table 3. — Intelligence Offices. 

Applications granted/ ........ 130 

Places licensed, . . . . . . . .109 

Cancelled, .......... 3 

Rejected, .......... 4 

Revoked, 2 

Transferred, .......... 4 

Fees collected, $4,225 

Of the applications granted: — 

41 were first-class, at $50, $2,050 

87 were second-class, at $25, . . . . . . .2,175 



$4,225 

Table 4. — Miscellaneous. 
Skating Rinks. 

Applications granted, ........ 1 

Fees collected, ......... $5 

Picnic Groves. 

Applications granted, ........ 3 

Places licensed, ......... 3 

Drivers' Permits. 

Granted, .......... 678 

Rejected, .......... 5 

Cancelled, 32 

Revoked, .......... 1 

Withdrawn, .......... 2 

Table 5. — Ice Cream, Confectionery, Soda Water and Fruit. 

Applications granted,^ ........ 356 

Places licensed, .......... 343 

Rejected, . . . . . . . . . . Ill 

Transferred, .......... 3 

Cancelled, .......... 12 

Revoked, .......... 1 

Withdrawn, 19 

Fees collected, $1,770 

The fee as established by the Board is $5. 

Total amount received and paid into the treasury on account of 

miscellaneous licenses, ...... $10,004 



Two reconsidered and rejected before payment was made. 

One license cancelled for nonpayment of fee; one license not yet paid for. 



22 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



Tabi-e 6. — Holders of Commox Victualer Licenses, arr.\xged 

according to nationality. 

American, .......... 974 

Armenian, .......... 68 

Assyrian, .......... 14 

Austrian, .......... 9 

British Pro^^nces, ......... 6 

Canadian, .......... 69 

Chinese, .......... 14 

Cuban, ........... 1 

Danish, .......... 1 

English, 92 

French, .......... 16 

German, .......... .57 

Grecian, 133 

Hebrew, 126 

Hungarian, .......... 1 

Irish, SI 

Itahan, 264 

Norwegian, .......... 8 

Nova Scotian, ......... 4 

Polish, 1 

Portuguese, .......... 5 

Russian, .......... 120 

Scotch, 10 

Spanish, .......... 1 

Swedish, .......... 18 

Turkish, .......... 5 

West Indian, ......... 1 



Total, 2,099 

Innholders. 

American, .......... 15 

Russian, .......... 1 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 



23 



Table 7. — Holders of Fruit Licenses, arranged according to 

Nationality. 

American, .......... .5."> 

Armenian, .......... 22 

Assyrian, .......... 3 

Austrian, .......... 2 

British Provinces, ......... 3 

Canadian, .......... 1 

English, 3 

German, .......... 3 

Grecian, .......... 65 

Hebrew, .......... 31 

Irish, ........... 7 

Italian, . . . .143 

Norwegian, .......... 1 

Persian, 1 

Russian, .......... 40 

Scotch, .......... 2 

Spanish, .......... 1 

Swedish, .......... 1 

Turkish, 3 



Total, 387 

By order of the Board, the recording fees, provided for by 
chapter 100, section 10, Revised Laws, as amended by chapter 
291, Acts of 1906, were turned into the city treasury, together 
with whatever interest had accumulated. 

Fees and interest, 1906-07, $1,624 It) 

Fees and interest, 1907-08, 1,239 00 

Fees and interest, 1908-09, 1,471 42 



$4,334 61 

Drivers' cards were formerly good until revoked. Xow the 
drivers' cards expire September 1 of each year, and must be 
renewed upon their expiration. 



24 



LICENSING JiOARD. 



[Dec. 



Comparisons. 



Table 1. — Keceipts and Expenditures, Account of Licenses. 





1906-07. 


1007-08. 


1008-09. 


Liquor licenses. 
Rebates, 


$1,509,894 70 
56,441 71 


$1,509,306 03 
60,338 04 


$1,480,709 80 
17,501 87 


Miscellaneous licenses, 
Recording fees and inter- 
est, omitted from past 
reports. 


$1,453,452 99 
7,093 00 

) - 


$1,448,967 99 
7,947 00 

1 1,624 19' 
1 1,239 00' 


$1,463,207 93 
10,004 00 

1,471 42 


Totals, . 


$1,460,545 99 


$1,459,778 18 


$1,474,683 35 



Table 2. — Licenses. 





1006-07. 


1007-08. 


1008-09. 


First-class innholder, .... 


78 


78 


79 


First-class victualer, .... 


690 


690 


691 


Second-class victualer, 


7 


6 


6 


Fourth-class distiller, .... 


2 


2 


2 


Fourth-class wholesale dealer, "B," 


95 


102 


104 


Fourth-class grocer, .... 


74 


67 


62 


Fourth-class wholesale druggist, . 


6 


6 


6 


Fifth-class brewer, .... 


21 


20 


20 




973 


971 


970 


Sixth-class druggist, .... 


224 


208 


195 


Seventh-class alcohol, 


14 


11 


11 


Clubs, ...... 


50 


43 


43 




288 


262 


249 



Common Victualers. 



Applications granted, .... 


1,585 


2,107 


1,981 


Places licensed, ..... 


1,426 


1,704 


1,641 


Rejected, ...... 


125 


258 


282 


Cancelled, ...... 


153 


391 


336 


Revoked, ...... 


6 


12 


283 


Transferred, ..... 


22 


51 


37 


Withdrawn, ..... 






34 



1 1906-07, paid in 1907. 



2 1907-08, paid in 1907. 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 



25 



Innholders. 





1906-07. 


1907-OM. 


1908-09. 


Applications granted, .... 


14 


15 


16 


Places licensed, ..... 


13 


13 


14 


Rejected, ...... 


5 


1 




Cancelled, ...... 


1 


2 




Revoked, ...... 


" 




2 



Billiard, Pool and Sippio Tables, and Bowling Alleys. 



Applications granted, .... 


406 


412 


445 


Places licensed, ..... 


324 


347 


374 


Rejected, ...... 


54 


122 


76 


Transferred, ..... 


16 


11 


13 


Cancelled, ...... 


34 


42 




Revoked, ...... 


10 


15 


2 


Withdrawn, ..... 






22 



Intelligence Offices. 



Applications granted, .... 


107 


122 


130 


Places licensed, ..... 


89 


100 


109 


Rejected, ...... 


5 


10 


4 


Transferred, ..... 


5 


10 


4 


Cancelled, ...... 


4 


1 


3 


Revoked, ...... 






2 



Skating Rinks. 



Applications granted, . 






1 


1 


1 


Places licensed, . 


. 




1 


1 


1 


Picnic Groves. 


Applications granted, . 






3 


3 


3 


Places licensed, . 






2 


3 


3 


Rejected, . 






1 







26 LICENSING BOARD. [Dec. 



Drivers' Permits. 





1906-07. 


1007-08. 


1008-09. 


Granted, ...... 


200 


862 


678 


Rejected, ...... 


13 


16 


5 


Cancelled, ...... 


. 46 


49 


32 


Revoked, . 


1 


2 


1 


Withdrawn, ..... 






2 



Ice Cream, Confectionery, Soda Water atid Fruit. 



Granted, ...... 






356 


Places licen.sed, ..... 






343 


Cancelled, ...... 






12 


Rejected, ...... 






111 


Revoked, ...... 






1 


Transferred, ..... 






3 


Withdrawn, ..... 






19 



Expenditures from Dec. 1, 1908, to Dec. 1, 1909. 



Commissioners and secretary, salaries, .... $13,500 00 

Clerks, messengers, salaries, ...... 11,275 61 

Incidentals, 264 24 

Investigating liquor cases, ...... 60 20 

Furniture and repairs, . . . . . 168 35 

Light, 68 00 

Printing, postage and stationery, . . 2,144 01 

Rent and repairs, ........ 6,699 07 

Telephone, 496 77 

Travel, 224 95 



Total, $34,901 20 

Comparisons. 

1906, June 1 to Dec. 1, $17,054 26 

1906- 07, 36,703 71 

1907- OS, 34,160 02 

1908- 09, 34,901 20 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 



27 



License Fees as fixed by the Board for the Year 1909-10. 

The fees for licenses were lixed at the foUowing rates for 
the year commencing May 1, 1909, and ending April 30, 
1910, viz. : — 



For licenses of the first class, to sell all kinds of liquor, to be 
drunk on the premises: — 

Innholders, S2,000 GO 

Privilege to serve liquors to midnight (innholders), . 500 00 
Common victualers, ....... 1,100 00 



For licenses of the second class, to sell malt liquors, cider and 
light wines, containing not more than 15 per centum of 
alcohol, to be drunk on the premises : — 

Common \'ictualers, ....... 500 00 

For licenses of the fourth class, to sell all kinds of liquor and 
to bottle distilled liquors, not to be drunk on the premises: — 

Wholesale druggists, ....... 500 00 

Grocers, 1,000 00 

Wholesale dealers, "A," issued only in conjunction with 

a first-class license, ....... 300 00 

Wholesale dealers, "B," 1,000 00 

Distillers, 1,000 00 

For licenses of the fifth class, to sell malt Hquors, cider and 
light wines, containing not more than 15 per centum of 
alcohol, not to be drunk on the premises : — 

Bottlers, issued only in conjunction with another license, 500 00 
Brewers, 1,000 00 

For a license of the sixth class, to druggists, . . 1 00 

For a license of the seventh class, to sell pure alcohol, . . 1 00 



For a club license. 



500 00 



Public Document No. 74 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Licensing Board for the City 
OE Boston. 



December, 1910. 




BOSTON : 

WEIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Squabe. 
1911. 



Public Document 



No. 74 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Licensing Board for the City 
OF Boston. 



December, 1910. 




BOSTON: 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
IS Post Office Square. 

1911. 

c 



Approved by 
The State Boaed or Publication. 



2i:i)e iHommcntucaltl) of iHa06acl)U0ctts* 



REPORT. 



Dec. 28, 1910. 

To His Excellency Eben S. Draper, Governor, Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts. 

Sir: — In accordance with chapter 5, section 91, Acts of 1906, 
the Licensing Board for the City of Boston has the honor to 
present its annual report for the year ending Nov. 30, 1910. 

The most important legislation affecting the liquor traffic 
enacted in recent years was chapter 476, Acts of 1910, generally 
known as the bar and bottle bill, forbidding the granting in the 
same licensed premises of a license to sell liquor to be drunk on 
the premises and one to sell liquor not to be drunk on the premises. 
This act took effect on its passage, May 3, 1910, and therefore no 
new licenses, nor any transfers of old licenses, have been granted 
since that date except in compliance with that law. For example, 
licensees holding the two classes of licenses issued as of May 1, 
who have been allowed to enlarge their premises or to transfer 
to new locations, whether from choice or necessity, have in every 
case surrendered one of their licenses for cancellation; and the 
purchasers of an existing business conducted under the two classes 
of licenses have been granted a license of only one class, although 
the full license fees of both licenses for the year have been paid, 
resulting in substantial financial loss to some licensees. Just what 
will be the effect of this law during the coming year on the licensees 
and on the previous policies of the Licensing Board cannot be 
safely predicted. It is very evident, however, from the requests 
already made to the Board, confirmed by reports showing the 
obligations for which the licensees have bound themselves, that 
the Board will probably be obliged to make a change in its policy 
as regards the number of licensed places in the difterent parts of 
the city. The Board still adheres to its former opinion that under 



4 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



conditions heretofore existing there were too many licensed places 
in Charlestown, South Boston, East Boston, near the North Station 
and in parts of Roxbury ; but the conditions throughout the whole 
city will be so materially changed by the recent legislation that 
the former policy of the Board as to the location of licenses can 
no longer be maintained without some modifications. The Board 
has refused for the past few years to transfer licenses into certain 
districts, although it has granted transfers of licenses already 
existing within those districts. To continue this policy in face 
of the desire for licenses by those who wish to continue their re- 
tail and wholesale businesses in separate and distinct premises by 
the purchase of an additional license will put a fictitious value 
on Ucenses if the would-be purchasers are limited by the restric- 
tions formerly imposed. The Board has already learned that it 
will have many requests from licensees for permission to buy an 
additional license on the ground that they cannot abandon either 
branch of their business without serious financial loss to themselves, 
their landlords and their creditors. 

At the time of taking office the Board found a custom, long 
established, permitting — with the approval of the Board — the 
sale and transfer either of licenses actually in operation or of 
"license papers," so called, held by former licensees who for one 
reason or another had not applied for a renewal of their licenses 
or whose business under the licenses had ceased. Properly speak- 
ing, the sale of a " license paper " is no other than the sale of a 
privilege of applying for a license in the place of a former licensee, 
either at the old or at some new location. Although this privilege 
was, and is, possible only by consent of the licensing authorities, 
the custom was so firmly established and was so relied upon, not 
only by the licensees but also by their creditors, landlords and the 
public at large, and approved by the United States Bankruptcy 
Courts, that the Board has not felt justified in adopting any rule 
that would materially change the custom. It has refused, how- 
ever, to recognize any mortgage of a license, and has insisted that 
the proceeds of the sale of a license should be used first for the 
equal protection of the creditors of the business before other 
claims should be recognized. 

The difference between the market price of a license and the 
fees for a license in this city early attracted the attention of the 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 



5 



Board, and the advisability of a new scale of fees has been fre- 
quently discussed, especially since the market price has advanced 
from about $5,000 to $8,500 between ]May 1 and November ::>0 
of this year. How permanent this increase in price will prove to be 
cannot be predicted, as the price depends largely on location. If 
the present or higher prices should be generally maintained it is 
obvious that an increase in all fees will be inevitable. The Board 
is not yet convinced that the prices will remain fixed at the present 
level. It will, however, make for the coming year the following 
changes, which it deems advisable largely because of the benefit 
certain licensees will probably derive as a result of the recent 
statute : — 

The innholders' fee will be increased from . . . $2,000 to S2,200 
The fourth-class license "B," wholesale, will be increased 

from 1,000 to 1,100 

The fourth-class license distiller will be increased from 1,000 to 1,100 
The fifth-class license brewer will be increased from 1,000 to 1,500 

The fifth-class license bottler will be increased from . 500 to 1,100 

The other fees will remain unchanged, except that the Board 
has voted to discontin^ie the issue of grocers' licenses, in place of 
which fourth-class licenses "B" wholesale will be issued. It has 
voted, also, to issue no more fourth-class "A" licenses (those 
formerly issued only in conjunction with innholders' and first- 
class licenses), the fee of which was $300. 

During the past year the Board voted that in all future appli- 
cations, due regard being had for existing conditions, it would 
apply, for the benefit of private schools of acknowledged standing, 
the same provisions now protecting by statute the public schools. 

The Board from the beginning has endeavored to confine the 
transfer of licenses and the granting of new locations to the begin- 
ning of the license year, believing that the interests of the public 
and the licensees were best secured by concentrating the applica- 
tions as much as possible to one period of the year. Exceptions 
to this rule, owing to death, sickness, bankruptcy or other impera- 
tive reasons, must frequently be made in order that injustice shall 
not be done to the licensees and the public; but the Board has 
endeavored to reduce these exceptions to as small a number as 
possible. It believes that a license once granted should be held 



6 



LICEXSLXG BOARD. 



[Dec. 



by the licensee, if possible, for the full license year for which it was 
granted, and should not be used simply as a means of trade and 
speculation. Too frequent changes, either of licensees or of loca- 
tions, are unsettling, both to the public and the licensees them- 
selves. 

The Board would again call attention to the unequal distribu- 
tion of licenses in the different sections of the city. Table 3 of 
this report, on page 16, based on the recent census of 1910, shows 
that the inequality tends to become greater each year. The census 
also shows that Boston has 1 licensed place to every 690, and 1 
saloon for every 980 of the population, as against 1 for every 614 
and 1 for every 862, respectively, as shown by the census of 1905. 

Druggists' Licenses. 
The Board in former reports has stated its belief that the present 
law regulating druggists' licenses is not beneficial to the city of 
Boston. Requests for new locations, especially in suburban dis- 
tricts, are constantly presented to the Board, and in every case 
the petitioner states that he needs the license for the protection 
of his prescription business, or to satisfy the demands of his regu- 
lar customers." The Board is satisfied, not only from the state- 
ments made to it by the druggists themselves but also from the 
personal experience and knowledge of the members of the Board, 
that alcoholic liquors are prescribed in cases of sickness with ever- 
increasing infrequency, and therefore that there is no real necessity 
for the sale by druggists of liquor except on physicians' prescrip- 
tions. It believes that the present law allowing the sale of liquor 
on the payment of the absurdly small fee of SI, on the mere signing 
of a statement that it is to be used for " medicinal, mechanical or 
chemical" purposes, is a direct encouragement of hypocrisy and 
leads to a contempt of the law. However desirable the present 
law may be for other cities and towns in the Commonwealth, the 
Board is convinced that for the city of Boston under present 
conditions it is unwise and harmful, and a distinct hindrance 
to the proper regulation of the liquor traffic. The Board there- 
fore recommends that in Boston the sale of alcoholic liquors, 
except pure alcohol, shall be restricted to sales only on prescrip- 
tions given by physicians in good standing, and that the fee for 
such a license shall be at least So. For the sale of pure alcohol^ 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 74. 



so commonly used in sickness, it would recommend a special 
license with a fee of $5, the alcohol to be sold, as at present, on the 
statement of the purchaser of the purpose for which it is to be 
used. 

Sunday Licenses for the Sale of Fruit, Ice Cream, 
Soda Water and Confectionery. 
The Board has received few complaints of the manner in which 
the holders of these licenses conduct their business. It has re- 
quired, as far as practicable, that the licensees should make fruit 
the principal article sold, and it has endeavored to impress on 
them the necessity of keeping their premises clean and of pro- 
tecting their fruits of all kinds from contamination by flies and 
other insects. This rule it proposes to insist upon more strongly 
in the coming year. 

Common Victualers. 
The benefit to the city of the fee for a common victualers' 
license, authorized by chapter 383, Acts of 1910, and fixed at So 
by the Board, has been realized only in part this year, owing to 
the fact that the act did not take effect until May 12, 1910, after 
the greater part of the licenses had been issued. Another year the 
revenue from these licenses should be at least S6,000. 

Quarters. 

Before attempting to secure new quarters, as permitted by 
chapter 387, Acts of 1909, the Board has been awaiting the com- 
pletion of the enlargement of the Court House, hoping that quar- 
ters therein might be assigned to it, as it believes that the Court 
House is the most suitable place for its headquarters because of 
its central location and the probable saving to the city in the 
matter of rent. It believes that the inconvenience and annoyance 
of its present quarters should be endured so long as there seems any 
possibility of obtaining adequate quarters in the Court House. 

Intelligence Offices. 
The Board has continued the investigation of the intelligence 
offices, although the additional work brought on it by the bar and 
bottle bill has prevented it from going as thoroughly into the 



8 



LICEXSIXG BOARD. 



[Dec. 



question as it desired. It awaits the results of the investigation 
of the commission authorized by the Legislature before making 
any recommendations. 

Complaints. 

Fifteen complaints were received against licensees, with the 
following results : — 

Liquor. 

Dismissed, not proven, 4 

No action necessarj', 3 

Suspended, charges proven, 4 

Reprimanded, 2 

13 

Druggist. 

Forfeited, charges sustained, 2 



Ix General. 

Although the Board is not limited in its expenses to the appro- 
priations granted by the city, it has never exceeded its appropria- 
tion, although its duties have become each year more exacting 
while the appropriations granted it have been decreased. It has, 
therefore, been hampered in many investigations, especially of 
those activities other than the liquor traffic, coming under its 
supervision. Page 30 gives details of receipts and expenses. 

Xo permission now exists allowing holders of licenses of the 
first class to store their goods except on their licensed premises. 
Before the passage of the bar and bottle bill those holding other 
licenses in conjunction with a first-class license could store in 
warehouses approved by the Board, under the provisions of the 
statute permitting such storage. The Board believes that the same 
opportunity for storage should be given the holders of all licenses. 

It renews its recommendation of last year for "legislation com- 
pelling proprietors of storage warehouses to report to the Licens- 
ing Board the names and addresses of all persons storing liquor 
in said warehouses." 

The Board respectfully expresses the hope that any legislation 
materially changing the laws governing the liquor traffic will be 
enacted early in the session. Chving to the deferred action on the 
so-called bar and bottle bill last April the Board had great difii- 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT- No. 74. 



9 



culty in issuing the licenses on May 2, and then only by the readi- 
ness of its force to surrender its holiday (April 19) and to wf)rk 
overtime. 

The following details will show the great amount of work im- 
posed upon the Board and its office force during the months of 
February, March and April in each year. 

Under the provisions of chapter 100, section 12, of the Revised 
Laws, the Licensing Board for the City of Boston, when authorized 
by vote of the city to grant licenses for the sale of liquor, may 
grant such licenses during the month of April, to take efi'ect 
May 1. Because of the many details connected with the appli- 
cations and investigations, the licenses must be granted a sufficient 
time before the first day of May if the licensed places are to be 
legally opened on that day. The following are some of the details 
above referred to : — 

In case of the reissuance of a liquor license, or, in fact, a license 
of any kind, the applicants, in accordance with the law, present 
their applications in ]\Iarch and April for the class of license they 
desire. These applications must be carefully compared with the 
applications of the preceding year, to see if there is any change 
either in the premises, location or applicants themselves. If there 
are any changes in any details applicants are interviewed by the 
Board as to the reasons for the changes desired. 

In case the changes involve alterations in the premises the 
applicants must submit a plan showing such alterations. If the 
changes are in the personnel of the licensees, the papers con- 
nected therewith must be filed with the Board. All applications 
and proposed changes are referred to the police for investigation 
and report. The number of changes which take place every year 
at this time average 400 

When the applications are correct in the above details they are 
indexed and an advertisement notice is then made out. The law 
requires that the advertisements shall be published in two city 
papers, and, in case of the suburban applications, in the local 
papers, by the Licensing Board, and a proof is required so that 
there may be no variation in the application and the published 
notice. The applications and proofs are then compared, and the 
latter, if correct, are returned to the newspapers for publication. 

By law, any person who is an abutting owner can protest, under 



10 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



certain conditions, within ten days of the advertisement. This 
protest is acknowledged and placed on file against the application, 
and when the latter is taken up for final action the protest is con- 
sidered and hearings given when necessary. These hearings do not 
require so much time as the numerous hearings arising from objec- 
tions, which, while not legally required, are necessary for public 
and private interests and the proper conduct of the liquor business. 

A license for each class named in the application is prepared 
and carefully compared with the published advertisement. If the 
applications, after having passed through the various stages, are 
correct, they are granted by the Board by each member affixing 
his signature thereto. 

After the license application is granted the licensee is notified 
to that effect on forms prepared in the office of the Board. These 
forms describe the class of license and the amount to be paid 
therefor at the office of the city collector. Blank bonds are given 
with the above notice, and these bonds must be filled out and 
filed with the city treasurer. Ten days are prescribed for the pay- 
ment of the license fee. 

After the fee has been paid and the bond deposited the licensee 
is required to return to this office the receipts given to him by the 
city collector and the city treasurer, when his license is then ready 
or issuance. 

Each license is signed by each member of the Licensing Board 
individually. After the licenses are thus signed they are arranged 
according to police divisions and sent to the police for delivery on 
April 30. 

In addition to the work connected with the liquor licenses the 
Board, during April, has to act upon applications for some 1,500 
or 1,600 common victualer renewals and new applications, some 
250 billiard and pool renewals and new applications, some 115 
intelligence office renewals and new applications, and some 600 
fruit, ice cream, soda water and confectionery renewals and new 
applications. Tiie actual time expended in the examination and 
manual labor of signing the liquor applications and licenses is not 
less than ten full days. 

The Board is glad at this time to record its appreciation of the 
faithful and efficient services of its secretary and other employees. 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 74. 



11 



The Commissioner of Police and the officers and men of his 
department have shown cordial and effective co-operation with 
the work of this Board, and have responded heartily to all re- 
quests for aid and information. The Board takes pleasure in 
expressing its appreciation of the valuable services of the police 
department. 

Every action of the Board has been determined by the unani- 
mous approval of the three members. 

Very respectfully, 

EZRA H. BAKER. 
FRED A. EMERY. 
SAJNI'L H. HUDSON. 



APPENDIX. 



APPENDIX. 



Licenses for the Sale of Intoxicating Liquor. 
The law licensing the sale of intoxicating liquor in this city 
provides that not more than 1 place shall be licensed for each 
500 of the population, as ascertained by the last national or State 
census, nor shall the number of places in any event exceed 1,000. 

Table 1. — Number of Places Licensed. 



Number of places granted during the j^ear, ' 976 

Number of licenses held but not located, 8 

Number of licenses not issued, 16 

Number of licenses surrendered for cancellation, .... 25 

Number of new licenses granted in their places, .... 25 

The following is a classified list of the licensed places in force 
Nov. 30, 1910: — 

First-class innholder, 78 

First-class victualer, 684 

Second-class victualer, 6 

Fourth-class distiller, 2 

Fourth-class wholesale dealer, ''B," 112 

Fourth-class grocer, 65 

Fourth-class wholesale druggist, 5 

Fifth-class brewer, 20 



Total, 972 

Sixth-class licenses, 192 

Seventh-class licenses, 11 

Club licenses, 43 



Total, 246 



' Four bcensed pL- ces granted; licenses not paid for. 



16 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



The statutes provide for seven classes of licenses. 
The number of licenses issued under the classification of statute 
are as follows : — 

Table 2. — Number of Licenses issued from Dec. 1, 1909, to Dec 1, 



1910. 

For Full Year. 

First class, 766 

Second class, 6 

Fourth class, 915 

Fifth class, 78 

Sixth class, 198 

Seventh class, 11 



Total, 1,974 

Special club, 44 

Special 12 o'clock privilege, 28 

For Part of Year. 

First class, 16 

Fourth class, 19 

Fifth class, 1 



Total, 36 



Table 3. — Distribution of Licenses by Districts and Population. 



[Population, United States Census of 1910, 670,585.] 



District. 


Population. 




Licensed Places. 


Boston proper, .... 


186,586 


590 including 400 saloons. 


Roxbury, 


111,386 


135 


<( 


93 


South Boston, .... 


66,361 


80 


a 


67 


Charlestown, .... 


41,444 


74 


u 


59 


East Boston, .... 


58,488 


41 


a 


34 


West Roxbury, .... 


60,643 


27 


n 


16 


Brighton, 


26,575 


13 


u 


9 " 


Dorchester, 


119,102 


12 


11 


6 " 



Boston proper has 1 license to every 316 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to 
every 466. 

Roxbury has 1 license to every 825 inliahitants, and 1 saloon to every 
1,197+. 

South Boston has 1 license to every 829+ inhabitants, and 1 saloon 
to every 990. 



1910.] ITBLK^ IKX rMEXT — No. 74. 17 

Charlestown lias 1 license to every 560 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to every 
702. 

East Boston has 1 license to every 1,426+ inhabitants, and 1 saloon 
to every 1,720. 

West Roxbury has 1 license to every 2,246 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to 
every 3,790. 

Brighton has 1 license to every 2,044 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to every 
2,952+. 

Dorchester has 1 license to every 9,925 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to every 
19,850. 



Licensed Places. 



District. 


Innholders. 


Saloons. 


Grocers. 


Other 
Classes. 


Totals. 


Boston proper. 


68 


400 


27 


95 


590 


Roxbury, .... 


2 


93 


17 


23 


135 


South Boston, . 


1 


67 


1 


11 


80 


Charlestown, . 


2 


59 


7 


6 


74 


East Boston, . 


2 


34 


3 


2 


41 


West Roxbury, 


1 


16 


4 


6 


27 


Brighton, .... 
1 

Dorchester, 


2 


9 


1 


1 


13 






5 


1 


12 


Totals, 


78 


684 


65 


145 


972 



Table of 1909 for Comparison with this Year's Table. 
Distribution of Licenses by Districts and Population. 

iPopulation. Decennial Census of 1905, 595.380.] 



District. 


Population. 


Licensed Places. 


Boston proper, .... 

Roxbury, 

South Boston, .... 
Charlestown, .... 
East Boston, .... 
West Roxbury, .... 

Brighton, 

Dorchester, 


166,428 
102,180 
64,091 
39,983 
51,334 
54,179 
21,806 
95,379 


589 including 404 saloons. 
136 " 96 

80 " 67 

74 " 59 

41 " 34 

26 16 

12 9 

12 6 



18 LICENSING BOARD. [Dec. 

Boston proper has 1 license to every 283 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to every 
412. 

Roxbury has 1 license to every 751 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to every 
1,064. 

South Boston has 1 license to every 801 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to 
every 956. 

Charlestown has 1 license to every 540 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to every 
677+. 

East Boston has 1 Hcense to every 1,252 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to 
every 1,509+. 

West Roxbury has 1 license to every 2,084 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to 
every 3,386. 

Brighton has 1 license to every 1,817 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to every 
2,422+. 

Dorchester has 1 license to every 7,948 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to every 
15,896+. 

Licensed Places. 



District. 


Innholders. 


Saloona. 


Grocers. 


Other 
Classes. 


Totals. 


Boston proper. 


69 


404 


26 


90 


589 


Roxbury, .... 


2 


96 


17 


21 


136 


South Boston, . 


1 


67 


1 


11 


80 


Charlestown, . 


2 


59 


7 


6 


74 


East Boston, 


2 


34 


3 


2 


41 


West Roxbury, 


1 


16 


3 


6 


26 


Brighton, .... 


2 


9 




1 


12 


Dorchester, 




6 


5 


1 


12 


Totals, . 


79 


691 


62 


138 


970 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 19 



Table 4. — Number of Licensed Places by Wards. 



ARD. 


Innholder. 


First-class 

Victualer. 


Sfcond-class 
1 Victualer. 


Fourth-class 
Grocer. 


Fourth - class 
Wholesale 
Dealer "B." 


1 unh-class 
Distiller. 


Fourth-class 
Druggist. 


Fifth-class 

Brewer. 


Totals. 


1, . . . 




Q 




o 
Z 










11 


2, . . . 


o 






1 


o 
z 








30 


3, . . . 


1 


1 1 
ii 




o 
Z 










1 A 

14 


4, . . . 




99 












o 
Z 


oo 
ZO 


5, . . . 


1 


9A 
ZD 

















6, . . . 


1 Q 


1 /19 


Q 

o 


z 


oi 


i 


4 




zOZ 


7, . . . 


91 


1 99 




a 
D 


OO 




1 

i 




lob 


8, . . . 


c 



Oo 




o 

Z 


Q 
O 








05 


9, . . . 


A 


11 






Z 








47 


10, ... 


1 O 


1 A 

io 


Z 


a 

y 


r 









A O 

4z 


11, ... 


6 


11 




2 




_ 


_ 


_ 


19 


12, ... 


3 


15 




6 


2 








26 


13, ... 




43 


- 




6 




- 


1 


50 


14, ... 


1 


11 






1 


1 






14 


15, ... 




11 




1 


1 






1 


14 


16, ... 




5 




3 










8 


17, ... 


1 


22 




3 


2 






1 


29 


18, ... 


1 


32 




4 


2 








39 


19, ... 




24 




5 


2 






12 


43 


20, ... 




5 




1 


1 








7 


21, ... 




3 




1 


2 








6 


22, ... 




16 




1 


4 






2 


23 


23, ... 


1 


9 


1 


4 








1 


16 


24, ... 




1 




4 










5 


25, . . . 


2 


9 




1 


1 








13 


Totals, . 


78 


684 


6 


65 


112 


2 


5 


20 


972 



Table 5. 
Granted and paid for 



Number of Licenses, paid and unpaid from May 1 to 
Dec. 1, 1910. 



First-class innholder, 


78 at $2,000, 


$150,000 00 


First-class victualer, 


687 


1,100, 


755,700 00 


Second-class victualer. 


6 


500, 


3,000 00 


Fourth-class grocer, . 


67 


1,000, 


67,000 00 


Fourth-class wholesale dealer. 








''A," 


678 


300, 


203,400 00 


Fourth-class wholesale dealer. 








"B," 


160 


1,000, 


160,000 00 


Fourth-class druggist. 


6 


500, 


3,000 00 


Fourth-class distiller, 


2 


1,000, 


2,000 00 


Amount carried forward, . 




. $1,350,100 00 



20 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



Amount brought forward, . 



81,350,100 00 



Fifth-class brewer, . 
Fifth-class bottler, . 
12 o'clock pri\Tlege, . 

Granted but not paid for: — 
First-class ^^ctualer, 
Fourth-class wholesale dealer, 

"A," 



20 

58 
28 



LOOO, 20,000 00 
500, 29,000 00 
500, 11,000 00 



-81,413,100 00 



4 at 81,100, $4,400 00 
4 300, 1,200 00 



5,600 00 
81,418,700 00 



Table 6. — Number of Licensed Places, Licenses Single and in 
Conjunction, paid and unpaid, from May 1 to Dec. 1, 1010. 
Single : — 



First-class victualer, ..... 


at 


5>l,iUU, 


coo nrvn 
S22,000 


(Xj 


Second-class victualer, 


5 


-f\r\ 

oOO, 


2,o00 


00 


First-class innholder, ..... 


4 


J.OUU, 


8,000 


00 


Fourth-class grocer, ...... 


bo 


1,000, 


00,000 


rvrv 

00 


Fourth-class wholesale dealer, *'B," 


/O 


1 f\nn 
1,UUU, 




00 




6 


500 


3 000 


00 

yjyj 


Fourth-class distiller, 


2 


i,oooi 


2,000 


00 


Fifth-class brewer, 


13 


1,000, 


13,000 


00 


In conjunction: — 










First-class innholder and fourth-class whole- 










sale dealer, '' A," 


46 


2.300. 


105,800 


00 


First-class innholder, fourth-class wholesale 










dealer ''A," and 12 o'clock privilege, 


18 


2,800, 


50,400 


00 


First-class innholder and 12 o'clock privilege, 


10 


2,500, 


25,000 


00 


First-class ^'ictualer and fourth-class whole- 










sale dealer, "A." 


618 


1,400, 


865,200 


00 


First-class \'ictualer and fourth-class whole- 










sale dealer, "B," 


34 


2,100, 


71,400 


00 


First-class victualer, fourth-class wholesale 










dealer, "B," and fifth-class bottler, . 


17 


2.600, 


41,200 


00 


First-class ^'ictualer and fourth-class grocer, 


2 


2,100, 


4.200 


00 


Second-class \4ctualer and fifth-class bottler, 


1 


1,000, 


1,000 


00 


Fourth-class wholesale dealer, "B,"and fifth. 










class bottler, ..... 


31 


1,500, 


46,500 


00 


Fourth-class grocer and fifth-class bottler, . 


2 


1,500, 


3,000 


00 


Fifth-class brewer and fifth-class bottler. 


7 


1,500, 


10,500 


00 




977 ^ 


$1,418,700 


00 



* One wholesale druggist license was surrendered and cancelled, and a wholesale dealer, 
" B," license gianted in place thereof. 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 74. 21 



Table 7. — Liquor License Fees from 1885 to 1910. taken from the 
Records in this Office. 



Date. 


Amount. 


Places. 


Dec. 1, 


1885, 


to Dec. 


1, 


1886, .... 


S608,113 


00 


2,289 


Dec. 1, 


1886, 


to Dec. 


1, 


1887, .... 


588,480 


00 


1,863 


Dec. 1, 


1887, 


to Dec. 


1, 


1888, .... 


621,574 


00 


1,711 


Dec. 1, 


1888, 


to Dec. 


1, 


1889, .... 


888,308 


00 


1,568 


Dec. 1, 


1889, 


to Dec. 


1, 


1890, .... 


1,016,500 


00 


807 


Dec. 1, 


1890, 


to Dec. 


1, 


1891, .... 


1,033,872 


00 


892 


Dec. 1, 


1891, 


to Dec. 


1, 


1892, .... 


1,058.146 


00 


896 


Dec. 1, 


1892, 


to Dec. 


1, 


1893, .... 


1,064,033 


00 


896 


Dec. 1, 


1893, 


to Dec. 


1, 


1894, .... 


1,084,194 


00 


896 


Dec. 1, 


1894, 


to Dec. 


1, 


1895, .... 


1,192,989 


00 


89o 


Dec. 1, 


1895, 


to Dec. 


1, 


1896, .... 


1,447,096 


00 


896 


Dec. 1, 


1896, 


to Dec. 


1, 


1897, .... 


1,457,235 


00 


n A o 

993 


Dec. 1, 


1897, 


to Dec. 


1, 


1898, .... 


1,469,171 


00 


992 


1 

Dec. 1, 


1 oc\o 

189S, 


to Dec. 


1, 


lb99, .... 


1,489.575 


00 


992 


Dec. 1, 


1899, 


to Dec. 


1, 


1900 


1,488,468 


00 


Aor» 

989 


Dec. 1, 


1900, 


to Dec. 


1, 


1901 


1,439.684 


00 


986 


Dec. 1, 


1901, 


to Dec. 


1, 


1902, .... 

1903, .... 


1,426,608 


27 


£70U 


Dec. 1, 


1902, 


to Dec. 


1. 


1,440.237 


95 


979 


Dec. 1, 


1903, 


to Dec. 


1, 


1904, .... 


1,438,132 


16 


980 


Dec. 1, 


1904, 


to Dec. 


1, 


1905 


1,455,681 


50 


980 


Dec. 1, 


1905, 


to Dec. 


1, 


1906, .... 


1.480.749 


00 


980 


Dec. 1, 


1906, 


to Dec. 


1, 


1907, .... 


1,509,894 


70 


974 


Dec. 1, 


1907, 


to Dec. 


1, 


1908 


1,509,306 


03 


973 


Dec. 1, 


1908, 


to Dec. 


1, 


1909, .... 


1,480,709 


80 


970 


Dec. 1, 


1909, 


to Dec. 


1, 


1910, .... 


1,450,100 


38 


972 



Table 8. — Xvmber of Licenses issued and Amount paid into the 

Treasury. 

From Dec. 1, 1909, to Dec. 1, 1910, for Full Year. 



78 first-class innholders, at 82,000, . . 8156,000 00 

688 first-class victualers, at §1,100, . . 756.800 00 

6 second-class victualers, at 8500, . 3.000 00 
679 fourth-class wholesale dealers, '*A," at 

S300, 203,700 00 

160 fourth-class wholesale dealers, ''B," at 

SI, 000, 160.000 00 

68 fourth-class grocers, at 81,000, . . 68,000 00 

2 fourth-class distiUers, at S1,000, . 2,000 00 

6 fourth-class wholesale druggists, at S500, . 3,000 00 

20 fifth-class brewers, at 81,000, . . . 20,000 00 



Amount carried forward, . . . $1,372,500 00 



22 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



Amount brought forward, 



Sl,372,500 00 



58 fifth-class bottlers, at S500, 
44 clubs, at $500, 



29,000 00 
22,000 00 
198 00 
11 00 



198 sixth-class druggists, at SI, . 
11 seventh-class alcohols, at SI, 



$1,423,709 00 



From Dec. 1, 1909, to Dec. 1, 1910, for Part of Year. 



1 first-class innholder, SI, 333 36 

15 first-class victualers, 5,062 52 

12 fourth-class wholesale dealers, "A," . 912 44 

6 fourth-class wholesale dealers, "B," . 4,367 91 

1 fourth-class grocer, 372 14 

1 fifth-class bottler, 343 01 



12,391 38 



28 special 12 o'clock liquor privilege, for the full year, ex- 
piring April 30, 1911, 



14,000 00 



Total, 



SI ,450,100 3 8 



Twenty-five licenses have been surrendered for cancellation and 
new licenses issued in their place. Because of the bar and bottle 
bill, when new^ licenses have been surrendered for cancellation and 
new ones issued in their place, the Board has been enabled to 
retire from active working 1 first-class license, 6 fourth-class whole- 
sale dealer, "A," licenses, and 1 fourth-class wholesale dealer, "B,*' 
license. In the cases where these have been retired it has been 
because of change in location and ownership. Rebates have been 
granted in only two special cases. 



Table 9. — Rebates. 



Rebates granted. 



S734 94 



Total revenue for liquor licenses. 
Less rebates, 



Sl,450,100 38 
734 94 



Sl,449,365 44 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 74. 



2.3 



Table 10. — Showing Gains and Losses in Liquor Revenue, also 
IN Revenue derived from Miscellaneous Fees, etc., since 
June 1, 1906. 





Liquor. 


Miscellaneous Fees, etc. 


Year. 


Gain. 


Loss. 


Gain. 


Loss. 


I^ocord i 
Fees 
and Interest. 


1905-06, . 


_l 


_l 








1906-07, . 


$22,505 34 






$170 00 


$1,624 19 


1907-08, . 




$4,485 00 


$854 00 




1,239 00 


1908-09, . 


14,239 94 




2,057 00 




1,471 42 


1909-10, . 




13,842 49 


3,312 00 


_ 


1,454 97 


Totals, . 


$36,745 28 


$18,327 49 


$6,223 00 


$170 00 


S5,789 58 



1 No comparison, part of year only. 



Net gain liquor, $18,417 79 

Net gain miscellaneous, 11,842 58 



Total net gain, $30,260 37 

Miscellaneous Licenses. 
Table 1. — Common Victualers and Innholders. 
Common Victualers without Liquor. 

Applications granted, 1,590 

Places licensed, 1,295 

Cancelled, 285 

Rejected, 104 

Revoked, 10 

Transferred, 36 

Withdrawn, 35 

Fees collected, $1,475 



Of the common victualers' licenses granted, 15 were for lunch 
carts. 

Chapter 383 of the Acts of 1910 established a fee of not more 
than So on common victualers and innholders. This fee went 
into effect on jNIay 12, 1910. Of the 1,590 applications granted, 
302 were granted after ]May 12, 1910. Of this number, 5 were 



24 LICENSING BOARD. [Dec. 

cancelled for nonpayment of fee and 2 licenses have not yet been 
paid for, leaving 295 licenses paid for at So each, making a total 
of SI, 475 collected. 

Innholders without Liquor. 

Applications granted, 21 

Places licensed, 19 

Cancelled, 1 

Revoked, 1 

Fees collected, $5 

Only 1 innholders' license was granted after May 12, 1910. 

Table 2. — Billiard, Pool and Sippio Tables, and Bowling Alleys. 

Applications granted, ^ 449 

Places licensed, 395 

Cancelled, 32 

Rejected, 53 

Revoked, 14 

Transferred, 20 

Withdrawn, 26 

Fees collected, $4,136 

Number of Tables and Alleys. 

Billiards, 335 

Pool, 1,212 

Sippio, 3 

Bowling alleys, 518 



2,068 

The fee is $2 for each table and alley. 

Table 3. — Intelligence Offices. 

Applications granted, 124 

Places hcensed, 101 

Cancelled, 7 

Rejected, 4 

Revoked, 8 

Transferred, 13 

Withdrawn, 8 

Fees collected, S4,050 



> Of the applicat ions granted, 55 were licenses for clubs. 



1910.] 



PUBLIC 1)0(1 MEXT — 



Xo. 74. 



25 



Of the applications granted: — 

38 were first class, at $50, $1,900 

86 were second class, at $25, 2,150 

$4,050 

Table 4. — Miscellaneous. 
Picnic Groves. 

Applications granted, 4 

Places licensed, 3 

Revoked, 1 

Drivers' Permits. 

Granted, 508 

Cancelled, 12 

Rejected, 12 

Revoked, 2 

Withdrawn, 3 

Table 5. — Ice Cream, Confectionery, Soda Water and Fruit. 

Applications granted, ' 736 

Places hcensed, 671 

Cancelled, 63 

Rejected, 102 

Revoked, 2 

Transferred, 13 

Withdrawn, 19 

Suspended, 15 

Fees collected, $3,650 

The fee established by the Board is S5. 

Total amount received and paid into the treasury on account of 
miscellaneous Hcenses, $13,316 

Table 6. — Holders of Common Victualer Licenses, arranged 
according to nationality. 

American, 863 

Armenian, 68 

Assyrian, 16 

Austrian, 8 

Belgian, 4 

British Provinces, 35 

Canadian, 56 



' Six licenses cancelled for nonppyment of fee. 



26 LICENSING BOARD. [Dec. 

Chinese, 19 

Cuban, 1 

Danish, 1 

EngUsh, 68 

Finlander, 1 

French, 14 

German, 43 

Grecian, 113 

Hebrew, 136 

Hungarian, 2 

Irish, 85 

Itahan, 176 

Ne\\^oundlander, 3 

Norwegian, 8 

Nova Scotian, 8 

Polish, 2 

Portuguese, 6 

Russian, 69 

Scotch, 11 

Swedish, 17 

Turkish, 2 



Total, 1,835 

Innholders. 

American, 19 

Enghsh, 1 

Italian, 3 

Russian, 3 

Table 7. — Holders of Fruit Licenses, arranged according to 

Nationality. 

American, 164 

Armenian, 38 

Assyrian, 10 

Austrian, 4 

British Provinces, 7 

Canadian, 5 

Enghsh, 6 

French, 1 

German, 11 

Grecian, 108 

Irish, 21 

Itahan, 229 

Norwegian, 1 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 



27 



Portuguese, 

Persian, 

Polish, 

Roumanian, 

Russian, . 

Scotch, 

Turkish, . 

Total, 



'J 
1 
2 
2 

158 
4 
3 

778 



By the order of the Board, the recording fees, provided for by 
chapter 100, section 10, Revised Laws, as amended by chapter 291, 
Acts of 1906, were turned into the city treasury, together with 
whatever interest had accumulated. 

Fees and interest, 1906-07, 81,624 19 

Fees and interest, 1907-08, 1,239 00 

Fees and interest, 1908-09, 1,471 42 

Fees and interest, 1909-10, 1,454 97 



Total, 



$5,789 58 



Drivers' cards were formerly good until revoked. Now the 
drivers' cards expire September 1 of each year, and must be 
renewed upon their expiration. 



Comparisons. 

Table 1. — Receipts and Expenditures, Account of Licenses. 





1907-08. 


1908-09. 


1909-10. 


Liquor licenses, . 
Rebates, .... 


$1,509,306 03 
60,338 04 


$1,480,709 80 
17,501 87 


$1,450,100 38 
734 94 


Miscellaneous licenses, 
Recording fees and inter- 
est. 


$1,448,967 99 
7,947 00 
/ 1,624 191 
1 1,239 002 


$1,463,207 93 
10,004 00 

} 1,47142 


$1,449 365 44 
13,316 00 

1,454 97 


Totals, .... 


$1,459,778 18 


$1,474,683 35 


$1,464,136 41 



1 1906-07, paid in 1907 



= 1907-08, paid in 190; 



28 LICENSING BOARD. [Dec. 



Table 2. — Licenses. 





1907-08. 


1908-09. 


1909-10. 


First-class innholder, 


78 


79 


78 


First-class victualer, 


690 


691 


684 


Second-class victualer, .... 


6 


6 


6 


Fourth-class distiller, .... 


2 


2 


2 


Fourth-class wholesale dealer, ''B," 


102 


104 


112 


Fourth-class grocer, 

Fourth-class wholesale druggist. 


67 


62 


65 


6 


6 


5 


Fifth-class brewer, 


20 


20 


20 




971 


970 


972 


Sixth-class druggist, 


208 


195 


192 


Seventh-class alcohol, .... 


11 


11 


11 


Clubs, 


43 


43 


43 




262 


249 


246 



Common Victnalers. 



Applications granted, .... 


2,107 


1,981 


1,590 


Places licensed, 


1,704 


1,641 


1,295 


Cancelled, 


391 


336 


285 


Rejected. 


258 


282 


104 


Revoked, 


12 


283 


10 


Transferred, 


51 


37 


36 


Withdrawn, 




34 


35 



Innholders. 



Applications granted, .... 


15 


16 


21 


Places licensed, 


13 


14 


19 


Cancelled, 


2 




1 


Rejected, 


1 






Revoked, 




2 


1 



Billiard, Pool and Sippio Tables and Bowling Alleys. 



Applications granted, .... 


412 


445 


449 


Places licensed, 


347 


374 


395 


Cancelled, 


42 




32 


Rejected, 


122 


76 , 


53 


Revoked, 


15 


2 


14 


Transferred, 


11 


13 


20 


Withdrawn, 




22 


26 



1910.] PUBLIC I)0(T\MEXT — No. 74. 29 



Intelligence Offices. 





1907-08. 


1908-09. 


1909-10. 


Applications granted, .... 


122 


130 


124 


Places licensed, 


100 


109 


101 


Cancelled, 


1 


3 


7 


Rejected, 


10 


4 


4 


Revoked, 




2 


8 


Transferred, 


10 


4 


13 


Withdrawn, 




~ 


8 



Skating Rinks. 



Applications granted, 




1 


1 




Places licensed, . 




1 






Picnic Groves. 


Applications granted, 




3 


3 


4 


Places licensed, . 




3 


3 


3 


Revoked, 








1 



Drivers' Permits. 



Granted, 


862 


678 


508 


Cancelled, 


49 


32 


12 


Rejected, 


16 


5 


12 


Revoked, 


2 


1 


2 


Withdrawn, 




2 


3 



Ice Cream, Confectionery, Soda Water and Fruit. 



Granted, 




356 


736 


Places licensed, 




343 


671 


Cancelled, 




12 


63 


Rejected, 




111 


102 


Revoked, 




I 


2 


Transferred, 






13 


Withdrawal, 




19 


19 


Suspended, 






15 



30 



LICEXSIXG BOARD. 



[Dec. 



EXPEXDITURES FROM DeC. 1, 
Commissioners and secretary'', salaries, 
Clerks, messengers, salaries, 
Advertising, 
Books and binding, 
Furnitm'e and repairs. 

Incidentals, 

Investigating liquor cases. 
Investigating miscellaneous licenses, 
Light, . . 
Printing, . 
Rent and repairs, 
Stationer}', 
Telephone, 
Travel . 

Total, 



1909, TO Dec 



1910. 
813,.500 00 
10,437 19 
430 97 
.327 60 
14.5 13 
248 70 
733 00 
12.5 25 
81 10 
1,093 20 
6,7-29 53 
753 88 
415 71 
28 40 

S35,049 66 



Comparisons. 





Appropriations. 


Expenditures. 


1906, June 1 to Dec. 1, . . . . 




$17,0^ 26 * 


1906-07 


S50,000 00 3 


36,703 71 


1907-08, 


37,500 00 


34,159 52 


1908-09 


37,500 00 


34,901 20 


1909-10, 


35,000 00 


35,049 66 * 



' Paid from police department appropriation. 

' Expenditures as given are from December to December, and approprtatioiis are for the 

fiscal year, i.e., Februarj- to February. 

» $12,000 of this amount was turned over to the mayor to be used by him for otb«r departments 
« Although the expenditiu^s for this year show lar?er than the appropriation, they wUl be less 

than the appropriation for the fiscal year. 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 74. 



31 



License Fees as fixed by the Board for the Year 1911-12. 

The fees for licenses have been fixed at the following rates for 
the year commencing May 1, 1911, and ending April 30, 1912, 
viz.: — 



For licenses of the first class, to sell all kinds of liquor, to 
be drunk on the premises: — 

Innholders, S2,200 GO 

Pri\'ilege to serve liquors to midnight (innholders only), 

additional, 500 00 

Licensed common \'ictualers, 1,100 00 

For licenses of the second class, to sell malt liquors, cider 
and light wines, containing not more than 15 per centum 
of alcohol, to be drunk on the premises: — 

Licensed common victualers, 500 00 

For licenses of the fourth class, to sell all kinds of liquor and 
to bottle distilled liquors, not to be drunk on the prem- 
ises: — 

Wholesale druggists, 500 00 

Wholesale dealers, 1,100 00 

Distillers, 1,100 00 



For licenses of the fifth class, to sell malt liquors, cider and 
hght wines, containing not more than 15 per centum of 
alcohol, not to be drunk on the premises: — 

Bottlers, issued only in conjunction vdth another license, 1,100 00 



Brewers, 1,500 00 

For a license of the sixth class, to druggists, .... 1 00 

For a license of the seventh class, to sell pure alcohol, . . 1 00 

For a club license, . . . .- 500 00 



Licenses cannot be transferred from one person to another. 



Public Document No. 74 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THX 



Licensing Board for the City 
OE Boston. 



December, 1911. 




BOSTON: 

WEIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1912. 



Public Document 



No. 74 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF TlIK 

Licensing Board for the City 
OF Boston. 



Decembek, 1911. 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1912. 



Approved by 
Thf. State Board of Publication, 



2il)e Commonuiealtl) of iltassacljusctts. 



REPORT. 



Dec. 29, 1911. 

To His Excellency Eugene N. Foss, Governor, CommomceaUh of Massa- 
chusetts. 

Sir: — In accordance with chapter 5, section 91, of the Acts of 
1906, the Licensing Board for the city of Boston has the honor to 
present its annual report for the year ending Nov. 30, 1911. 

When the so-called bar and bottle bill (chapter 476 of the Acts 
of 1910) took effect on its passage, May 3, 1910, the Ucenses for 
the year 1910-11 had been issued, and although all licenses granted 
during the balance of that year were issued in strict conformity to 
that act, it was not until the licenses for the year 1911-12 were 
issued on ^lay 1 of this year that all licenses were controlled by 
that legislation. In order that the act should have its full effect 
the Board permitted, with a few exceptions, licensees to choose 
under which of the two classes of licenses they would operate, but 
after a choice had been made and a license had been issued it has 
not allowed a licensee to change from one class to another. On 
April 13, 1911, the Board published the following statement re- 
garding its position on the bar and bottle bill. 

April 13, 1911. 

Before the passage of chapter 476, Acts of 1910, the Licensing Board 
carefully discussed the pro\'isions of the act and unanimously decided 
that the intention of the act was that a hcense to sell liquor ''to be drunk 
on the premises" and a hcense to sell hquor "not to be drunk on the 
premises" could not be exercised in the same place or premises. It acted 
almost immediately on that interpretation of the law and after May 3, 
1910, when the act went into effect, every apphcant for a change of loca- 
tion or for an enlargement of his premises was obliged to choose under 
which of the two hcenses he would operate. This position of the Board 
was clearly stated in its annual report to the Governor dated Dec. 28, 
1910. Previous to our report, realizing the difficulties that many licen- 
sees would experience because of the new law, and in order to ascertain 



4 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



the pro))able wishes of the licensees, every licensee holding licenses of the 
first and fourth classes was asked certain questions by the Board in a 
printed communication, a copy of which is as follows: — 

To Holders of Liquor Licenses of the First and Fourth Classes. 

In order that it may carry out the pro\'isions of chapter 476, Acts of 1910 (the 
so-called bar and bottle bill), with justice to all interested, the Licensing Board 
asks you to co-operate with it by answering the following questions at your earli- 
est convenience : — 

1. For how long a time have you had a hquor license? 

2. For how long a time have you had your present location? 

3. Have you a lease of your present premises or are you a tenant at will? 

4. When did your lease begin? 

5. When does it end? 

6. Is there any provision for its renewal? 

7. If so, for how long a time? 

8. What proportion (approximately) of your business is first class? 

9. What proportion (approximately) of your business is fourth class? 

10. For which class of license will you probably wish to apply for the year be- 

ginning May 1, 1911? 

11. Do you intend to ask the Board's consent to purchase an additional 

license in order to have two licensed places, one operating under a li- 
cense of the first class, the other under a license of the fourth class? 
The information above requested is for the private use of the Board and is 
desired only that the Board may have as many facts as possible before receiving 
applications for licenses for the year 1911-12. 

Ezra H. Baker, 
Fred A. Emery, 
Samuel H. Hudson. 
Nov. 21, 1910. Licensing Board. 

In answer to the above inquiries a very large majority of the licensees 
repUed stating their probable wishes and since then every licensee has 
made application for only one license in one place. In many cases 
licensees who have wished to continue the first class and fourth class 
licenses have obtained from the Board permission to buy an additional 
license and have applied for licenses to be conducted in places absolutely 
separated from each otlier, with separate and distinct entrances from 
the street. 

After careful consideration of the conditions controlling the different 
licensees entailing a large amount of additional work and after a great 
majority of the applications for licenses for 1911-12 had been received, 
considered and discussed and were ready to be acted upon by this Board, 
a formal request was made to us on April 7, 1911, to construe the act 
in a way different from our previous decision. 

Further consideration and discussion not only of chapter 476, Acts of 
1910, but of the statutes relating to the sale of liquor has convinced the 
Board that it should not change its decision as it believes it was clearly 
the intention of the Legislature to prohibit the sale of liquor "to be drunk 
on the premises" in the same place, rooms, space, shop or store where 
liquor is sold "not to be drunk on the premises." 



1911.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 



5 



The Board has further determined to exercise the authority given by 
the act and has decided not to grant a fourth-class hcense in conjunction 
with an innholder's Hcense. 

From this it will be seen that the Board has from the time when 
the act became effective given it the strictest interpretation. 

Since the beginning of the present license year the Board has 
noticed several changes in the conditions surrounding the liquor 
traffic. How far these changes are to be attributed to the bar and 
bottle bill is a matter for discussion, and how permanent they 
may be is also doubtful, but some of the effects are so pronounced 
that even if they later sjiould prove to be only temporary, at this 
time the Board must nevertheless take notice of them. 

The Board has noticed a tendency to the concentration of 
Hcenses in fewer and stronger hands; an increased demand for 
bottlers' licenses; a marked increase in the demand for innholder, 
club and drug licenses, and especially a material increase in the 
price of the so-called "license papers" which are, as explained in 
the report of the Board for 1910, "the privilege of applying for a 
license in the place of a former licensee." 

Since May 1, 1911, the price of this privilege or "license paper" 
has ranged from $11,000 to $15,000, the prevailing price being 
about $12,500, as against $8,500, Jan. 1, 1911, and $3,500, June 1, 
1906, when this Board took office. This year the Board endeavored 
to check speculation in these "license papers" by announcing that 
after August 1 it would not consider a transfer of a license except 
for death, sickness, bankruptcy, or other imperative reasons. At 
the present time the price seems to be $12,500 or higher, and the 
Board would be neglectful of the interests of the city if it did not 
increase the fees for licenses. The fact that the whole number of 
licensed places has been limited to one thousand, and the city 
has increased in population and has voted for license ever since the 
prohibitory law was repealed in 1875, has necessarily given to the 
license privilege a value which does not obtain in cities where the 
conditions have been different. In view of the value of this privi- 
lege compared to the fees paid to the city and of the benefit to 
certain classes of licensees coming from the bar and bottle bill, 
the Board has voted to increase the fees and has fixed them for 
the year 1912-13 as follows: — 



6 LICENSING BOARD. [Dec. 

First-class innholders, $2 500 00 

Privilege to serve liquors to midnight (innholders onh'), 

additional, 500 00 

First-class common victualers, 1,200 00 

Second-class common victualers, 500 00 

Fourth-class wholesale druggists, 1,200 00 

Fourth-class wholesale dealers, 1,200 00 

Fourth-class distillers, 1 ,200 00 

Fifth-class bottlers; issued only in conjunction with anotlier 

license, 1,500 00 

Fifth-class brewers, 2,000 00 

Sixth-class druggists, 1 00 

Seventh-class (pure alcohol), ....... 1 00 

Club licenses, 500 00 



Just what the permanent result of the bar and buttle bill is to be 
it is too early to state. That it has helped some individual licensees 
and injured others is true; that it has helped the bottlers the 
Board is convinced; that it has increased the sale of bottled goods 
in homes is a fair inference. 

The Board is not prepared to make any statement beyond this; 
that individuals have been helped and harmed and that some 
classes of licenses have been greatly benefited. 

After a continuous service of five and a half years and in view of 
the probable change in its personnel the coming year the Board 
believes that this is a fitting time to review its work and present 
in a concise statement the policies it has adopted. Taking office 
with few, if any, preconceived ideas as to the details of its work 
the three members of the Board w^ere unanimously of the belief 
that they could have but little success without gaining the con- 
fidence of the licensees. They therefore, from the beginning, have 
tried to convince the latter that in their relations with the Board 
they could accomplish more by personal interviews than by relying 
upon the intervention of any third person, an intervention at 
times undoubtedly disinterested but too frequently, as the Board 
has been only too well aware, entirely selfish and unscrupulous. 
Although the Board is glad to believe that its intention to give 
every person fair and just treatment has been accepted by the 
great majority of the licensees as true, it must confess to a feeling 
of disappointment when licensees instead of coming directly to 
the Board with their requests have relied upon those who for selfish 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 74. 7 

reasons assumed to have influence with it or who were })eHeve(l 
to have such influence. 

During the past year especially the appeals of such people ha\ e 
greatly increased and the members of the Board have been followed 
to their private offices and even to their homes, not only by licensees 
or would-be licensees and their friends, but also by opponents of 
the liquor business who have not hesitated to use the same methods 
they so strongly object to in others. Such attempted influence for 
any purpose has had no favorable effect on the action of the Board. 

Among other policies adopted by the Board may be stated the 
following : — 

Prevention of the use of licensed places for political purposes. 
The restriction of licenses to business districts and public 
thoroughfares. 

Lessening the number of places where women can obtain liquor 
to be drunk on the premises. 

The extension of the restrictions as to licensed places in the 
neighborhood of public schools so as to include private schools of 
acknowledged standing. 

The refusal to grant new saloon licenses in the neighborhood of 
subway entrances and exits or transfer stations. 

The granting of rebates in cases of transfers only to those 
licensees who were compelled to transfer either by reason of death, 
sickness or some equally imperative reason. 

The restriction of licenses to citizens and voters of Boston. 

The Board has asked and obtained from the Legislature the 
authority to suspend licenses for violations of the conditions of 
the license and for violation of any law of the Commonwealth. 
This authority has been repeatedly availed of and has been most 
helpful both to the Board, to the licensees and to the community. 

It has been the earnest desire of the Board to restrict licensed 
places to thoroughfares and to business centers, and to remove 
them as opportunity^ offered from residential sections, especially 
those now overcrowded. Such removals are necessarily slow, 
while the change and movement of population in so large a city 
necessarily make exact descriptions of localities impossible. 

How to restrict the drinking of women in cafes or restaurants 
without stimulating it in the homes and kitchen barrooms is a 
question that has been constantly discussed by the Board. It is 
of the belief that large restaurants and hotel dining rooms are 



8 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



better than small places on back streets or private dining rooms, 
and has acted on that belief, although the increased attendance 
in the larger places on public thoroughfares has attracted notice 
and brought much ill-considered criticism. 

The Board is con\'inced that at the present time and under 
existing circumstances the present system is for Boston the best 
yet developed. That conditions can be bettered and the system 
improved is simply to state the hopes and aims that have animated 
the Board from its beginning. Certainly in Boston there have 
been no such flagrant \iolations of the law as shown by the pros- 
ecution and con\-iction of clubs, hotels and others in no-Hcense 
towns and cities during the past six months, nor does the Board 
believe that such xiolations could occur in Boston without prompt 
detection and punishment. 

The above-mentioned policies like ever\' action of the Board, 
not only for the past year but from its beginning, have been adopted 
by the unanimous agreement of the three members of the Board. 
This unanimity has been reached not by the overbearing dictation 
of one indi^^dual nor by the arbitrary- decision of a majority, but 
was the result of careful consideration and discussion. 

These policies, all remedial, represent a portion only of the 
work of the Board. Much of its time has been devoted to detail 
work and to hearings which have increased every year and to a 
marked extent the past year. These policies were not adopted 
all at once but from time to time as the need for them was shown; 
in cann ing them out the Board has endeavored to recognize exist- 
ing conditions, many of which were of long standing. How bene- 
ficial the results of the Board's work have been it leaves for others 
to say. It only claims that it has endeavored to act with all sin- 
cerity and fairness. 

Druggists' Licenses. 
The Board is still con^'inced that the present drug license is a 
gross injustice both to the community and to the holders of liquor 
licenses who pay much larger fees, especially in the city of Boston. 
It has recommended several times to the Legislature that the law 
should be changed. It has this year made another investigation 
of the sales in drug stores which, compared vrith the investigation 
made in 190S, shows that there has been no diminution of the 
e\'ils as stated in the report for that year. The Board is convinced 
that by no stretch of the imagination can the majority of sales of 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 



9 



liquor by druggists be really intended for medicinal purposes. The 
present statute leads only to a contempt for the law and to hypoc- 
risy and deceit. Druggists of the highest standing have stated to 
the Board their wish that sales of liquor in drug stores could be 
limited to sales only on physicians' prescriptions. Other druggists 
in apphing for hcenses during the past year have frankly stated 
that they wish them because licensed places where liquor could be 
purchased by the bottle had gone out of existence. 

Hyde Park. 

The annexation of Hyde Park to the city of Boston presents 
several problems requiring careful study and consideration. On 
November 17, after the State election, the Board voted that until 
further notice it would receive no appUcations for licenses in 
Hyde Park. This vote was pubUshed in the daily papers. On 
December IS, preliminary to further investigations, in response 
to its invitation the Board had the pleasure of meeting the five 
selectmen; Messrs. James D. Grant, chairman, Guy C. Lamson, 
John Alden, Robert ^lartin and Benjamin Clough, and Captain 
Grant of the police of Hyde Park, from whom they received much 
valuable information. In order that it may make the thorough 
study of the situation necessary the Board has voted that it will 
receive no application for a liquor license for at least one year from 
Jan. 1, 1912, and will grant drug licenses only after careful con- 
sideration. The officials of Hyde Park expressed their approval of 
the action of the Board. 

Hearings. 

During the past year the Board has given hearings on 16 dif- 
ferent complaints, 3 of which were dismissed. In the other cases 
it inflicted such penalties of suspension as the cases seemed to 
warrant. 

In its report for the year 190S the Board stated that it would 
give hearings on complaints from individuals as well as from the 
poUce, and as a result it has heard many complaints. It has also 
received a great many suggestions and complaints from individuals 
who did not wish to appear as public prosecutors. These informal 
statements have often brought about very helpful changes in the 
conduct of the places. In addition, countless numbers of anony- 
mous complaints have been received. For obvious reasons the 
Board has paid no attention to such complaints. 



10 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 1911. 



Recommendations. 
Having in mind the probable changes in its membership the 
coming year the Board does not make any recommendations for 
new legislation. The present members hope that at some future 
time such legislation may be enacted as will Hmit the sale of 
liquors — except pure alcohol — by druggists to physicians' 
prescriptions; and that other legislation may be obtained that 
will make the misrepresentation of his age by a minor, in order 
to obtain Hquor, a misdemeanor. They hope also that the present 
liquor laws may be revised and simplified so that they may be 
more clear and free from inconsistencies by which they are now 
confused. Such a revision will require careful investigation and 
consideration. 

Licenses for the Sale of Ice Cream, Confectionery, Soda 
Water and Fruit on the Lord's Day. 
Too many of those holding these licenses are inclined to be care- 
less in the observance of the conditions under which their Hcenses 
are issued and indifferent to the rules of the Board. Prompt 
revocation of the licenses will follow any deliberate violation of 
the conditions or neglect of rules. 

Intelligence Offices. 
The continued discussion of proposed legislation has caused 
the Board to refrain from any radical changes in the present sys- 
tem, and it has made no material increase in the number of such 
licenses. 

The Board records with pleasure its appreciation of the faithful 
and efficient services of its secretary and other employees. 

To the Commissioner of Police and the officers and men of his 
department the Board expresses its grateful thanks for their wil- 
ling and efficient aid in all matters referred to them. 

The annexed tables will give in detail the results of the work of 
the Board for the past year. 

Very respectfully, 



EZRA H. BAKER. 
FRED A.. EMERY. 
SAM'L H. HUDSON. 



APPENDIX. 



APPENDIX. 



Licenses for the Sale of Intoxicating Liquor. 
The law licensing the sale of intoxicating liquor in this city pro- 
vides that not more than 1 place shall be licensed for each 500 
of the population, as ascertained by the last national or State 
census, nor shall the number of places in any event exceed 1,000. 

Table 1. — Number of Places Licensed. 

Number of places granted during the 3'ear, ^ 979 

Number of licenses held but not located, 5 

Number of licenses not issued, 16 

Number of licenses surrendered for cancellation, .... 42 

Number of new licenses granted in their places, . . . ^ 4:1 

The follo^^-ing is a classified list of the licensed places in force 
Nov. 30, 1911: — 

First-class innholder, 77 

First-class \'ictualer, 591 

Second-class victualer, 5 

Fourth-class distiller, 2 

Fourth-class wholesale dealer, 279 

Fourth-class wholesale druggist, 4 

Fifth-class brewer, 20 



Total, -978 

Sixth-class Ucenses, 184 

Seventh-class Ucenses, 12 

Club Ucenses, 44 

Total, 240 



1 One license surrendered and cancelled. 

- One license to be granted and placed when building is ready for occupancy. 



14 



LICENSING BOARD. 



The statutes provide for seven classes of licenses. 
The number of licenses issued under the classification of statute 
are as follows : — 

Table 2. — Number of Licenses issued from Dec 1, 1910, to Dec. 1, 



1911. 

For Full Year. 

First class, 679 

Second class, 5 

Fourth class, 282 

Fifth class, 68 

Sixth class, 192 

Seventh class, 12 



Total, 1,238 

Special club, 45 

Special 12 o'clock privilege, 28 

For Part of Year. 

First class, 28 

Fourth class, 7 

Fifth class, 1 

Total, 36 



Table 3. — Distribution of Licenses by Districts and Population. 

[Population, United States Census of 1910, 670,585.] 



District. 


Population. 


Licensed Places. 


Boston proper, 


186,586 


598 including 343 saloons. 


Roxbury, 


•111,386 


131 


(( 


79 


South Boston, .... 


66,361 


79 


11 


57 


Charlestown, . .. 


41,444 


75 


u 


55 


East Boston, .... 


58,488 


43 


tl 


32 


West Roxbury, .... 


60,643 


26 


<< 


13 


Brighton, 


26,575 


14 


a 


8 


Dorchester, 


119,102 


12 


u 


4 



1911.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. IT) 

Boston proper has 1 license to every 312 inhaljitants, and 1 saloon to 
every 543+. 

Roxbury has 1 license to every 850 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to every 
1,409+. 

South Boston has 1 license to every 840 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to every 
1,164. 

Charlestown has 1 license to every 552+ inhabitants, and 1 saloon to 
ever J'- 753+. 

East Boston has 1 license to every 1,360 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to every 
1,827+. 

West Roxbury has 1 license to every 2,332 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to 
every 4,664+. 

Brighton has 1 license to every 1,898 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to every 
3,321 + . 

Dorchester has 1 license to every 9,925 inhabitants, and 1 saloon to every 
29,775+. 



Licensed Places. 



District. 


Inn- 
holders. 


Saloons. 


Wholesale 
Dealers. 


Other 
Classes. 


Totals. 


Boston proper. 


68 


343 


177 


10 


598 


Roxbury, .... 


1 


79 


37 


14 


131 


South Boston, . 


1 


57 


18 


3 


79 


Charlestown, . 


2 


55 


16 


2 


75 


East Boston, . 


2 


32 


9 




43 


West Roxbury, 


1 


13 


10 


2 


26 


Brighton, .... 


2 


8 


4 




14 


Dorchester, 




4 


8 




12 


Totals, 


77 


591 


279 


31 


978 



16 LICENSING BOARD. [Dec. 



Table 4. — Number of Licensed Pl.a.ces by Wards. 











Si: 






u 










si 


Ji as 
u ^ 


Fourth-cla.sa 
DistiUt 




if 




Ward. 


Innholdei 


First-class 
Victu 


Second-cl 
Victu 


Fourth - 
Wholo« 
Dealer. 


Fourth-cL 
Drug 


il 
IT 


.a 


1, 


_ 


9 


_ 


5 


_ 


— 


_ 


14 


2, 


2 


23 


_ 


4 


_ 


— 


_ 


29 


3, 


1 


10 


_ 


3 


_ 


— 


_ 


14 


4, 


_ 


21 


_ 


6 


_ 


— 


2 


29 




1 


24 


_ 


7 


_ 


— 




32 


6, 


19 


121 


3 


60 


1 


3 


_ 


207 


7, 


20 


108 


_ 


55 


_ 


1 


_ 


184 


8, 


6 


40 


_ 


21 


_ 


_ 


_ 


67 


9, 


4 


36 


— 


9 


_ 


— 


_ 


49 


10, 


10 


17 


2 


17 


_ 


_ 


_ 


46 


11, 


6 


7 




4 


- 


- 


_ 


17 


12, . . 


o 
o 


1 A 




1 f\ 






_ 


27 


13, 




36 


- 


12 




- 


1 


49 


14, 


1 


10 




2 


1 




_ 


14 


15, 




9 




4 






1 


14 


16, 




5 




4 






_ 


9 


17, 


1 


20 




8 






1 


30 


1 o 

18, 




24 




11 










19, 




21 




8 






12 


41 


20, 




4 




3 








7 


21, 




3 




4 








7 


22, 




14 




6 






2 


22 


23, 


1 


7 




7 






1 


16 


24, 








5 








5 


25, 


2 


8 




4 








14 


Totals, . 


77 


591 


5 


279 


2 


4 


20 


978 



Table 5. — Number of Licenses from May 1 to Dec. 1, 1911. 



Granted and paid for: — 



First-class innholder, .... 


. . 77 at S2,200, 


$169,400 00 


First-class victualer, .... 


. 602 


1,100, 


662,200 00 


Second-class victualer. 


5 


500, 


2,500 00 


Fourth-class wholesale dealer, . 


. 276 


1,100, 


303,600 00 


Fourth-class druggist. 


4 


500, 


2,000 00 


Fourth-class distiller, .... 


2 


1,100, 


2,200 00 


Fifth-class brewer, .... 


. 20 


1,500, 


30,000 00 


Fifth-class boctlej, .... 


. 48 


1,100, 


52,800 00 


12 o'clock privilege, .... 


. 28 


500, 


14,000 00 



$1,238,700 00 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 



17 



Table 6. — Number of Licensed Places, Licenses Single and in 
Conjunction, paid, from May 1 to Dec. 1, 1911. 



Single : — 



First-class victualer, ...... 


602 at 81,100. 


S6G'> 200 


00 


Second-class viccualer, ..... 


5 


500, 


2,500 


00 


First-class innholder, ...... 


49 


2,200, 


107,800 


00 


Fourth-class wholesale dealer, .... 


235 


1,100, 


258,500 


00 


Fourth-class wholesale druggist, 


4 


500, 


2,000 


00 


Fourth-class distiller, 


2 


1,100 


2,200 


00 


Fifth-class brewer, 


13 


1,500, 


19,500 


00 


In conjunction: — 










First-class innholder and 12 o'clock privilege, 


28 


2,700, 


75,600 


00 


Fourth-class wholesale dealer and fifth-class 










bottler, 


41 


2,200, 


90,200 


00 


Fifth-class brewer and fifth-class bottler. 


7 


2,600, 


18,200 


00 



Sl,238,700 00 



Table 7. — Liquor License Fees from 1885 to 1911, taken from the 
Records in this Office. 



Date. 



1885, 
1886, 
1887, 
1888, 
1889, 
1890, 
1891, 
1892, 
1893, 
1894, 
1895, 
1896, 
1897, 
1898, 
1899, 
1900, 
1901, 
1902, 
1903, 
1904, 
1905, 
1906, 
1907, 
1908, 
1909, 
1910, 



to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 
to Dec. 1 



1886, 
1887, 
1888, 
1889, 
1890, 
1891, 
1892, 
1893, 
1894, 
1895, 
1896, 
1897, 
1898, 
1899, 
1900, 
1901, 
1902, 
1903, 
1904, 
1905, 
1906, 
1907, 
1908, 
1909, 
1910, 
1911, 



Amount. 



$608,113 00 
588,480 00 
621,574 00 
888,308 00 
1,016,500 00 
1,033,872 00 
1,058,146 00 
1,064,033 00 
1,084,194 00 
1,192,989 00 
1,447,096 00 
1,457,235 00 
1,469,171 00 
1,489,575 00 
1,488,468 00 
1,439,684 00 
1,426,608 27 
1,440,237 
1,438,132 
1,455,681 
1,480,749 
1,509,894 
1,509,306 03 
1,480,709 SO 
1,450,100 38 
1,282,857 32 



18 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



Table 8. — Number of Licenses issued and Amount paid into the 

Treasury. 



From Dec. 1, 1910, io Dec. 1,1911 

77 first-class innholders, at $2,200, . 
602 first-class victualers, at $1,100, . 

5 second-class victualers, at $500, . 
276 fourth-class wholesale dealers, at $1,100, 
2 fourth-class distillers, at $1,100, . 
4 fourth-class wholesale druggists, at $500, 
20 fifth-class brewers, at $1,500, 
48 fifth-class bottlers, at $1,100, 

45 clubs, at $500, 

192 sixth-class druggists, at $1, . 
12 seventh-class alcohols, at $1, 



for Full Year. 

$169,400 00 

682,200 00 

2,500 00 

303,600 00 

2,200 00 

2,000 00 

30,000 00 

52,800 00 

22,500 00 

192 00 

12 00 



$1,247,404 00 



From Dec. 1, 1910, to Dec. 1, 1911, for Part of Year. 

3 first-class innholders, $3,169 48 

25 first-class victualers, 14,172 68 

5 fourth-class wholesale dealers, 3,325 42 

2 fourth-class grocers, 760 90 

1 fifth-class bottler, 24 84 

21,453 32 

28 special 12 o'clock liquor privileges, for the full year, ex- 
piring April 30, 1912, 14,000 00 

Total, $1,282,857 32 



Forty-two licenses have been surrendered for cancellation and 
new licenses issued in their place. ^ These changes have been the 
result of sales between parties. Rebates have been granted in only 
four special cases. 

Table 9. — Rebates. 
Rebates granted, $2,924 10 

Total revenue for liquor licenses, $1,282,857 32 

Less rebates, 2,924 10 

$1,279,933 22 



1 See Table I. 



1911.J 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 



19 



Table 10. — Showing Gains and Losses in Liquor Revenue, also 
IN Revenue derived from Miscell.\neous Fees, etc., since 
June 1, 1906. 



year. 



LlQLOR. 



Gain. 



1905- 06, 

1906- 07, 

1907- 08, 

1908- 09, 

1909- 10, 

1910- 11, 
Totals, 



$22,505 34 



14,239 94 



$36,745 28 



Loss. 



_ 1 

S4,48o 00 

13,842 49 
169,432 22: 



Miscellaneous Fees, etc. 



Gain. 



S187,7o9 71 

I 



$170 00 



$854 00 
2,057 00 
3,312 00 
7,039 00 



$13,262 00 $170 00 



Loss. 



Recording 
Fce.s and 
Interest. 



$1,624 19 
1,239 00 
1,471 42 
1,454 97 
1,469 99 



$7,259 57 



1 No comparison, part of year only. 

Net loss liquor, $151,014 43 

Net gain miscellaneous, 20,351 57 



Total net loss. 



$130,662 86 



Table 11, — Compl.\ints. 

Sixteen complaints were received against licensees, with the following 
results : — 



Nature of Complaint. 


Action taken. 


Number of 
Licenses. 


Liquor. 






For illegal gaming on the hcensed premises, 


Dismissed, 


1 


For violation of the condition of their license. 


Dismissed, 


1 


For selling to intoxicated persons, . 


Dismissed, 


1 


For selling to intoxicated persons, . 


Suspended, 


2 


For selling to a minor, 


Suspended, 


2 


For violation of a law of the Commonwealth, 


Suspended, 


4 


Druggists. 






For illegal selling on the Lord's day. 


Forfeited, . 


2 


For illegal selhng on the Lord's day, . 


Suspended, 


3 






16 



20 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



Miscellaneous Licenses. 
Table 1. — Common Victualers and Innholders. 

Common Victualers without Liquor. 

Applications granted, 1,526 

Granted, but not paid for in 1909-10, 2 

Places licensed, 1,215 

Cancelled, 303 

Rejected, 55 

Revoked, 8 

Transferred, 68 

Withdrawn, 53 

Fees collected, $7,365 



Of the licenses granted, 17 were for lunch carts, 14 of which are 
in actual operation. 

There were cancelled for nonpayment of license fee on account of 
1910-11, 50; on account of 1909-10, 1, making a total of 51, at 
$5 = $255; 4 licenses unpaid ^t S5 = $20; making a total of 
$275 to be deducted from $7,640, the amount which would have 
been received if all the licensees had paid, leaving a gross total 
due the city of $7,365. 

For purposes of bookkeeping it should be stated that the city 
really received $5 more than $7,365, or $7,370. Through an 
error the city received an overpayment of $5 for a license which 
was never issued, w^hich overpayment was refunded to the Licens- 
ing Board, making the net total amount received by the city, 
$7,365. 

Innholders without Liquor. 

Applications granted, 20 

Places licensed, 19 

Cancelled, 1 

Revoked, 

Rejected, 4 

Fees collected, SlOO 



Table 2. — Billiard, Pool and Sippio Tables, and Bowling Alleys. 

Applications granted, ^ 442 

Places licensed, 387 

Cancelled, 28 

Rejected, 94 



1 Of the applications granted, 43 were licenses for clubs. 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT - Xo. 74. 



21 



Revoked, 7 

Transferred, 14 

Withdrawn, 26 

Fees collected, S4.010 

Number of Tables and Alleys. 

Billiards, 299 

Pool, 1 1,196 

Sippio, 2 

Bowling alleys, 516 



2,013 

The fee is S2 for each table and alle3^ 

Table 3. — Ixtelligenxe Offices. 

Applications granted, 123 

Places licensed, 97 

Cancelled, 15 

Rejected, 4 

Revoked, 

Transferred, 17 

Withdrawn, 3 

Fees collected, $3,975 

Of the applications granted : — 

41 were first class, at $50. $2,050 

82 were second class, at $25, 2,050 

84,100 

Less 1 first class cancelled for nonpajnnent at S50, . $50 
Less 3 second class cancelled for nonpajinent at $25, . 75 

125 

Total collected, $3,975 

Table 4. — Miscellaneous. 

Picnic Groves. 

Applications granted, 3 

Places hcensed, 3 

Revoked, 

Drivers' Permits. 

Granted, 785 

Cancelled, 66 

Rejected 17 

Revoked, 10 

Withdrawn, 8 



1 Eight pool tables not yet paid for. 



22 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



Drivers' cards were formerly good until revoked. Now the 
drivers' cards expire September 1 of each year, and must be re- 
newed upon their expiration. 





Frl'it. 


Applications granted, 


1 1,002 


Places licensed, 


914 


Cancelled, 


S7 


Rejected, 


96 


Revoked, 


1 


Transferred, 


39 


Withdrawn, 


18 


Suspended, 


18 


Fees collected, 


S4,905 


The fee established by the Board is So.'^ 




Total amount received and paid into the treasury on account of 




miscellaneous licenses, 


$20,355 


Table 6. — Holders of Common Victualer Licenses, arranged 


ACCORDING TO NATIONALITY. 




American, 


867 


Armenian, 


76 


Assyrian, 


25 


Austrian, 


14 


Belgian, 


2 


British Provinces, 


44 


Canadian, 


42 


Chinese, 


15 


Cuban, 


1 


Danish, 


1 


Dutch, 


1 


Enghsh, 


46 


Finlander, 




French, 


16 


German, 


31 


Grecian, 


126 


Hebrew, 


131 


Hungarian, 


2 


Irish, 


61 


Itahan, 


131 


Mexican, 


1 


Newfoundlander, 


' 3 



* Seventeen licenses cancelled for nonpayment of fee. 
- Four licenses not yet paid for. 



1911.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 71. 2.3 

Norwegian, 

Nova Scotian, 10 

Polish, 3 

Portuguese, 9 

Russian, 0.3 

Scotch, 10 

Spanish, 2 

Swedisli, i;j 

Swiss, 1 

Turkish, U 



Total, 1,752 

Innholders. 

American, 10 

English, 1 

Irish, 1 

ItaUan, 1 

Roumanian, 2 



Total, 21 

Table 7. — Holders of Fruit Licenses, arranged accokdim, to 

Nationality. 

American, 215 

Armenian, 55 

Assyrian, 9 

Austrian, 

British Provinces, 6 

Canadian, 10 

English, 9 

French, 2 

German, 20 

Grecian, 131 

Irish, 33 

Italian, 356 

Mexican, 1 

Norwegian, 3 

Portuguese, 3 

Russian, 216 

Scotch, 3 

Spanish, 1 

Swedish, 2 

Turkish, 9 



Total, 



1,090 



24 



LICENSING BOARD. 



[Dec. 



By the order of the Board, the recording fees, pro\'ided for by 
chapter 100, section 10, Revised Laws, as amended by chapter 291, 
Acts of 1906, were turned into the city treasury, together with 
whatever interest had accumulated. 



Fees and interest, 1906-07, .SI, 624 19 

Fees and interest, 1907-08, 1,239 00 

Fees and interest, 1908-09, 1,471 42 

Fees and interest, 1909-10, 1,454 97 

Fees and interest, 1910-11, 1,469 99 



Total, $7,259 57 

Comparisons. 



Table 1. — Receipts and Expenditures, Account of Licenses. 





1908-09. 


1909-10. 


1910-11. 


Liquor licenses, . 
Rebates, .... 


$1,480,709 80 
17,501 87 


$1,450,100 38 
734 94 


$1,282,857 32 
2,924 10 


Miscellaneous licenses. 
Recording fees and interest. 


$1,463,207 93 
10,004 00 
1,471 42 


$1,449,365 44 
13,316 00 
1,454 97 


$1,279,933 22 
20,355 00 
1,469 99 


Totals, .... 


$1,474,683 35 


$1,464,136 41 


$1,301,758 21 



Table 2. — Licenses. 





1908-09. 


1909-10. 


1910-11. 


First-class innholder, 


79 


78 


77 


First-class victualer, 


691 


684 


591 


Second-class victualer, .... 


6 


6 


5 


Fourth-class distiller, 


2 


2 


2 


Fourth-class wholesale dealer, . 


104 


112 


279 


Fourth-class grocer, 


62 


65 




Fourth-class wholesale druggist. 


6 


5 


4 


Fifth-class brewer, 


20 


20 


20 




970 


972 


978 


Sixth-class druggist, 


195 


192 


184 


Seventh-class alcohol, .... 


11 


11 


12 


Clubs, 


43 


43 


44 




249 


246 


240 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 74. 



Common Vidualers. 





1908-09. 


1909-10. 


1910-11. 


Applications granted, .... 


1,981 


1,590 


1,526 


Places licensed, 


1,641 


1,295 


1,215 


Cancelled, 


336 


285 


303 


Rejected, 


282 


104 


55 


Revoked, 


283 


10 


8 


Transferred, 


37 


36 


68 


Withdrawn, 


34 


35 


53 



Innholders. 



Applications granted, .... 


16 


21 


20 


Places licensed, 


14 


19 


19 


Cancelled, 




1 


1 


Rejected, 






4 


Revoked, 


2 


1 





Billiard, Pool and Sippio Tables and Bowling Alleys. 



Applications granted^ .... 


445 


449 


442 


Places licensed, 


374 


395 


387 


Cancelled, 




32 


28 


Rejected, 


76 


53 


94 


Revoked, 


2 


14 


7 


Transferred, 


13 


20 


14 


Withdrawn, 


22 


26 


26 



Intelligence Offices. 



Applications granted, .... 


130 


124 


123 


Places licensed, 


109 


101 


97 


Cancelled, . . . . 


3 


7 


15 


Rejected, 


4 


4 


4 


Revoked, 


2 


8 




Transferred, 


4 


13 


17 


Withdrawn, 




8 


3 



Skating Rinks. 



Applications granted, .... 


1 






Places licensed, 


1 







26 LICENSING BOARD. [Dec. 



Picnic Groves. 



1908-09. 

1 


1909-10. 


1910-11. 


Applications granted, 


3^ 


4 


3 


Places licensed, 


3 


3 


3 


Revoked, 




1 




Drivers' Permits. 


Granted, 


678 


508 


785 


Cancelled, 


32 


12 


66 


Rejected, 


5 


12 


17 


Revoked, 


1 


2 


10 


Withdrawn, 


2 


3 


8 


Ice Creaniy Confectionery, Soda Water and Fruit. 


Granted, 


356 


736 


1,002 


Places licensed, 


343 


671 


914 


Cancelled, 


12 


63 


87 


Rejected, 


111 


102 


96 


Revoked, 


1 


2 


1 


Transferred, 


3 


13 


39 


Withdrawn, 


19 


19 


18 


Suspended, 




15 


18 



Expenditures from Dec. 1, 1910, to Dec. 1, 1911. 



Commissioners and secretary, salaries, $13,500 00 

Clerks, messengers, salaries, 11,464 75 

Advertising, 298 05 

Books and binding, 146 80 

Furniture and repairs, 334 99 

Incidentals, 172 33 

Investigating liquor cases, 204 50 

Investigating miscellaneous licenses, 31 75 

Light, 60 60 

Postage, 50 00 

Printing, 1,154 72 

Rent and repairs, 6,601 28 

Stationer^', 421 10 

Telephone, 379 61 

Travel, 106 50 



Toti^l, 



S34,926 98 



1911.1 PUBLIC DOCOIEXT NO. 74. 27 



Comparisons. 





Appropriations. 


Expenditures. 


1906, June 1 to December 1, . 

1906- 07, 

1907- 08, 

1908- 09, 

1909- 10, 

1910- 11, 


_ 1 

S50,000 003 
37,500 00 
37,500 00 
35,000 00 
40,000 00 


S17,054 26 2 
36,703 71 
34,159 52 
34,901 20 
35,049 66 4 
34,926 98 



License Fees as fixed by the Board for the Year 1912-13. 

The fees for licenses have been fixed at the following rates 
for the year commencing May 1, 1912, and ending April 30, 
1913, viz.: — 



For licenses of the first class, to sell all kinds of liquor, to be 
drunk on the premises : — 

Innholders, $2,500 00 

Privilege to sen'e liquors to midnight (innholders only), 

additional, 500 00 

Licensed coimnon victualers, 1,200 00 

For licenses of the second class, to sell malt liquors, cider and 
light wines, containing not more than 15 per -centum of 
alcohol, to be drunk on the premises : — 

Licensed common victualers, 500 00 

For licenses of the fourth class, to sell all kinds of liquor and 
to bottle distilled liquors, not to be dnmk on the prem- 
ises: — 

Wholesale druggists, 1,200 00 

Wholesale dealers, 1,200 00 

Distillers, 1,200 00 

For licenses of the fifth class, to sell malt liquors, cider and 
light wines, containing not more than 15 per centum of 
alcohol, not to be drunk on the premises: — 

Bottlers, issued onl}'' in conjunction with another license, 1,500 00 

Brewers, 2,000 00 

For a license of the sixth class, to dmggists, .... 1 00 

For a license of the seventh class, to sell pure alcohol, . . 1 00 

For a club license, 500 00 

Licenses cannot be transferred from one person to another. 

^ Paid from police department appropriation. 



2 Expenditures as given are from December to December, and appropriations arc for the fiscal 
year, i.e., February to February. 

' $12,000 of this amount was turned over to the mayor to be used by him for other departments. 

* Although the expenditures for this year show larger than the appropriation, they will be less 
than the appropriation for the fiscal year.